Dinopedia and related media

Albertosaurus

Name: Albertosaurus

Pronounced: al-BERT-oh-saw-russ

Description:
Slightly smaller than its close relative, the more famous Tyrannosaurus-Rex, Albertosaurus could reach up to nine meters (29.5 feet) in length and weigh as much as three tons. It had a pair of short, powerful arms and walked on two muscular legs that ended in three-toed clawed feet (similar to those of a bird) and allowed it to move relatively quickly, at speeds of nearly 25 miles per hour. Its long, tapered tail helped it greatly with balance and agility.

Fighting Style:
Evidence shows that Albertosaurus hunted in packs, making it an especially terrifying predator. Its keen sense of vision and ability to move quickly on two legs helped it track and zero in on its prey. Baring its sharp dagger-like teeth (each of which had a replacement growing underneath it), Albertosaurus would rush headlong at its intended victim, grab it with its powerful jaws, and rip through its flesh; its aim was to inflict an injury that would cause its victim to bleed to death.

Home Turf: North America - Canada (Alberta province)

When It Lived: Late Cretaceous period (about 75 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Like T-Rex, Albertosaurus was an apex predator, at the top of the food chain in its geographical range and time period. Its prey likely included herbivorous dinosaurs like the large but slower-moving Pachyrhinosaurus or the duck-billed Edmontosaurus.

Did You Know?:
Despite their heft and power, tyrannosaurs such as Albertosaurus had hollow bones, like those of a bird, that reduced the weight of their frame and made them more mobile.

Allosaurus

Name: Allosaurus

Pronounced: AL-oh-saw-russ

Description:
Weighing up to two tons and measuring up to 12 meters (39 feet) long, the Allosaurus walked on two legs and had relatively long forearms with three claw-type fingers. Its three-foot-long head was marked by a distinctive pair of bony ridges above and in front of its eyes.

Fighting Style:
Allosaurus used its tail for balance and killed its prey with the sharp talons on its forelimbs. Powerful neck muscles enabled it to drive its saber-like teeth into the tough hide of its prey, while its hinged jaw meant it could swallow large amounts of meat whole.

Home Turf: North America - Canada and USA

When It Lived: Late Jurassic Period (about 150 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Allosaurus was the biggest meat-eater in North America during the Late Jurassic Period. Evidence suggests that its likely victims were herbivores such as ornithiscian dinosaurs or the sauropod Apatosaurus. Allosauruses might have hunted in packs to capture these much larger dinosaurs, or might have stalked smaller prey such as Stegosaurus. It may have faced competition for its prey from the carnivorous Ceratosaurus.

Did You Know?:
The Allosaurus is the official State Fossil of Utah, where 60 individual juvenile and adult Allosaurus specimens were found at a single site.

Arctodus

Name: Arctodus (Giant Bear)

Pronounced: ARC-to-dus

Description:
Based on the skeletons that have been found, Arctodus stood 11.5 feet tall and weighed as much as 2,500 pounds--twice as big as the largest bears living today. Besides its enormous size, Arctodus had several features that set it apart from modern bears, including oversized teeth and a short muzzle relative to its wide skull, a fact that earned it the nickname "short-faced bear" or "bulldog bear." It also had unusually long front legs, which might have allowed it to reach speeds of more than 45 miles per hour and travel much greater distances than modern-day bears.

Fighting Style:
One of the giant bear's lethal weapons as a predator was its massive paws, equipped with long sharp claws and powered by a strong upper body. Its teeth also had the strength to crush bone, with a force that could reach more than 2,000 pounds per square inch. Arctodus was well-adapted for close combat situations, as it could intimidate with its sheer size and use its power to throw down and crush its enemies.

Home Turf: Across North America

When It Lived: Late Pleistocene Era (10,000 years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Most scientists believe Arctodus was an apex predator in its habitat because it could run down and overpower its prey--mainly bison, but perhaps also larger animals such as wooly mammoths. Others have argued that despite having the size necessary to be a mega-predator, Arctodus was too light-boned to be able to bring down such huge prey. Some of them think instead that the giant bear was a scavenger, relying mainly on the kills of other predators for survival.

Did You Know?:
The giant bear, Arctodus simus, can be distinguished from another type of North American short-faced bear, Arctodus pristinus, by its superior size. The closest living relative to the short-faced bear that exists today is Tremarctos ornatus, more commonly known as the spectacled bear, of South America.

Brygmophyseter - Ancient Whale
Brygmophyseter - Ancient Whale

Name: Brygmophyseter (Ancient Whale)

Pronounced:

Description:
The fossilized remains of an ancient whale known as Brygmophyseter were discovered and named in 1992 in Japan by Dr. Lawrence G. Barnes. This ancient whale was estimated to be some 35-40 feet long, which is medium-sized, compared to modern day whales, but was enormous for the time.

Fighting Style:
These ancient whales lived and hunted in groups called pods and would help defend each other if they were attacked. The whale had blunt, deeply rooted teeth that were designed to lock and hold on to slippery scale-covered prey. It also had a highly developed sonar system that allowed it to find prey in any type of water; it could also concentrate its sonar into a beam of sound energy that would stun and harm its enemies, or ram its attackers with its giant head.

Home Turf: Ocean waters around the world

When It Lived: Miocene and Pliocene Eras (roughly 25-5 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Like the Megalodon, or monster shark, Brygmophyseter was an apex predator, at the top of the food chain. It probably fed on dolphins, sea lion-type animals and other smaller whales, as well as fish, squid and small sharks.

Did You Know?:
The name Brygmophyseter, or "biting sperm whale," refers to the fact that the ancient whale had functional upper and lower teeth, as opposed to modern-day sperm whales, which have only lower teeth.

Camarasaurus
Camarasaurus

Name: Camarasaurus

Pronounced: KAM-ar-a-sore-us

Description:
Much smaller than its fellow sauropods, the camarasaurus could still measure up to 23 meters (75 feet) long and weigh as much as 20 tons. It walked on four thick legs, with a long tail and neck and a small head with a blunt snout and large nostrils.

Fighting Style:
Evidence has been found that Camarasaurus probably traveled in herds of older and younger members, perhaps so that adults could protect their young. Its most effective protection against attack was its superior size.

Home Turf: North America - United States

When It Lived: Late Jurassic Period (155-145 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Camarasaurus had large spoon-shaped teeth, perfect for eating the plants that were its main diet. Its predators include the large meat-eating dinosaurs of the region, including Allosaurus.

Did You Know?:
Camasaurus, or "chambered lizard," gets its name from the fact that its vertebrae were hollow, in order to decrease the weight of its long backbone.

Ceratosaurus
Ceratosaurus

Name: Ceratosaurus

Pronounced: Keh-RAT-oh-sore-us

Description:
The two-ton carnivore Ceratosaurus was up to six meters (almost 20 feet) long. It had a distinctive horn (actually an expanded nasal crest) on its snout and two smaller ones on its brow--its name means "horned lizard"--and a row of bony plates down the middle of its back.

Fighting Style:
Slightly smaller than its contemporary rival Allosaurus, Ceratosaurus was still a fierce meat-eating hunter. Its four-fingered hands (primitive for therapods) ended in sharp claws, and it killed its prey with large blade-like teeth.

Home Turf: North America - USA and Africa - Tanzania

When It Lived: Late Jurassic Period (159-144 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Ceratosaurus may have hunted in groups, and evidence suggests that it competed with Allosaurus for prey, including herbivores such as iguandonts, stegosaurs, and even the giant sauropods.

Did You Know?:
Some scientists have hypothesized that the Ceratosaurus used its incredibly strong and flexible tail to swim after its prey, as Ceratosaurus teeth have been found in areas rich with the remains of giant fish and crocodiles.

Deinonychus
Deinonychus

Name: Deinonychus

Pronounced: die-NON-i-kuss

Description:
This raptor dinosaur was about three meters (10 feet) long and weighed up to 175 pounds. It had a flexible neck, a big head and large, keen eyes.

Fighting Style:
Deinonychus's long, slender tail and spine encased in bony rods helped it maintain balance and change direction as it ran and attacked its prey. More than living up to its name ("terrible claw"), it used its sharp-clawed fingers and the 5-inch-long sickle-like talons on the second toe of each foot to grab its prey.

Home Turf: North America - USA

When It Lived: Early Cretaceous Period (120-110 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Deinonychus is believed to have hunted in packs, which would have allowed it to kill much larger victims, such as the herbivorous Tenontosaurus, or giant sauropod dinosaurs.

Did You Know?:
Deinonychus has given its name to the entire group of what are popularly known as raptor dinosaurs, or Deinonychosaurs. It was the model for the terrifying raptors in Steven Spielberg's blockbuster movie Jurassic Park (1993), although in reality Deinonychus was much smaller than the dinosaurs featured in the movie.

Dromoaeosaurus
Dromoaeosaurus

Name: Dromaeosaurus

Pronounced: DROM-ee-oh-saw-russ

Description:
This vicious dinosaur lends its name to the dromaeosaurids, one distinctive group of so-called "raptor dinosaurs." It was far smaller than most carnivorous predators in its habitat: It measured some 1.8 meters (almost 6 feet) long and weighed less than 100 pounds. Dromaeosaurus had a single large, sickle-like, retractable claw on the end of its second toe and more claws on its front limbs. Because of its assumed close relationship to modern-day birds, Dromaeosaurus' body may have been covered in feathers.

Fighting Style:
Dromoaesaurus, whose name means "running lizard," was in fact quick-moving and agile, with a large brain and quick reflexes. It used its long, stiff tail to change direction quickly, and would go after the softer, vulnerable parts of its prey with its claws and sharp teeth, hoping to inflict a fatal wound. Dromaeosaurus offset its biggest weakness--its small size and fragility--by hunting in packs, which allowed it to attack much larger prey.

Home Turf: North America - Canada and USA

When It Lived: Late Cretaceous Period (76-74 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Dromaeosaurus was sometimes forced to compete for its prey--which likely included large, slow-moving herbivores such as Edmontosaurus and Tenontosaurus--with the gigantic carnivore Tyrannosaurus-Rex.

Did You Know?:
The name "raptor dinosaur" came into common use after its prominent mention in the enormously popular Michael Crichton book (and Steven Spielberg movie) Jurassic Park. In fact, scientists dismiss the term “raptor” as a misnomer; there is already a group of birds called the raptors, which includes eagles and other hunters. The technical term for the group is deinonychosaurs, of which the Dromaeosaurs is one group.

Edmontosaurus
Edmontosaurus

Name: Edmontosaurus

Pronounced: ed-MON-toe-sore-us

Description:
The large, slow-moving Edmontosaurus measured up to 13 meters (42.5 feet) long and weighed more than four tons. It walked on two legs, but could also drop down to all fours, which allowed it to graze on low-lying plants. It had big hind legs ending in mitten-like paws, smaller and shorter arms with hoofed feet and a long pointy tail. Like all hadrosauroid dinosaurs, its most distinctive physical feature was its flat, duck-like beak. Edmontosaurus had the longest and broadest snout of all the hadrosauroids.

Fighting Style:
Because it lacked the type of body armor that protected other dinosaurs, such as ceratopsians, Edmontosaurus had only its large size and strength to deter and defend itself against attackers. It lived in very large herds, and attempted to avoid predators with its keen sense of vision and hearing. When attacked, Edmontosaurus probably kicked with its powerful hind legs and used its heavy tail to knock into its assailant.

Home Turf: North America - Canada (Alberta province)

When It Lived: Late Cretaceous Period (76-65 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Edmontosaurus was one of the largest herbivores in its environment, and one of the most successful (as evidenced by the number of fossils that have been found). It used its tough beak to gather and eat conifer needles, twigs, seeds and other plant material. Predators included giant meat-eaters such as Albertosaurus and Tyrannosaurus as well as smaller but vicious raptor dinosaurs like Dromoaeosaurus.

Did You Know?:
One of the reasons hadrosauroid dinosaurs may have been so successful was that their jaws were filled with huge numbers of extremely effective teeth, which allowed them to get more energy out of food faster. Whenever a tooth wore away or broke off, it was replaced by a new one, so that they had hundreds of teeth in their mouth at all times.

Gastonia
Gastonia

Name: Gastonia

Pronounced: gas-toh-nee-ah

Description:
This tank-like ankylosaurid dinosaur stood three feet high, measured four to five meters (13 to 16 feet) long, and weighed about one ton. It walked on four short stocky legs, and its entire body was covered by bony plates and spikes of different sizes and shapes.

Fighting Style:
Because of all its heavy armor, Gastonia was slow-moving, with poor eyesight but a powerful sense of smell and hearing. While the solid bony plate over its hips allowed it to crouch and protect its vulnerable abdominal zone from attacking predators, it used the spikes all over its body, and particularly on its tail, as offensive weapons. The sharp bony triangular plates near the base of Gastonia’s tail acted like powerful, sharp shears, seriously wounding a predator unlucky enough to get caught in its path.

Home Turf: North America – USA

When It Lived: Early Cretaceous Period (142-127 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
The herbivorous Gastonia was stalked by meat-eating predators such as Utahraptor, the largest of the known dromoaesaurid and a contemporary in the region.

Did You Know?:
Gastonia was named for the paleontologist Robert Gaston, who made the first discovery of its fossilized remains in Moab, Utah, in 1989.

majungatholus
majungatholus

Name: Majungatholus (Female)

Pronounced: mah-joong-gah-thol-us

Description:
Female Majungatholus dinosaurs were the same general size and shape as the males, with rough horned heads (although less brightly colored for females), short arms and legs, powerful tails and sharp teeth.

Fighting Style:
When a male approached, the female Majungatholus would stand her ground, turn to show her massive size and flash her teeth, which she would use to attack ferociously if her young were in danger.

Home Turf: Africa - Madagascar

When It Lived: Late Cretaceous Period (about 70 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Majungatholus was at the top of the food chain in its region; it ate titanosaurs and other sauropod dinosaurs (gigantic, long-necked plant-eaters). When food was scarce, there is also evidence of scavenging and cannibalism.

Did You Know?:
Scientists have guessed that the female Majungatholus might have been faster and more agile than the male, and a more aggressive warrior, in order to defend her young.

majungatholus
majungatholus

Name: Majungatholus (Male)

Pronounced: mah-joong-gah-thol-us

Description:
Measuring up to 6 meters (almost 20 feet) long and weighing up to one ton, Majungatholus had had horn-like protrusions (probably brightly colored in the case of the male) covering its skull. One paleontologist described it as having Òthe kind of face only a mother could love.

Fighting Style:
Majungatholus used its bony, bumpy head to butt its enemies head-to-head or head-to-flank, or wielded its heavy tail like a baseball bat. It overcame its weaknesses--relatively short, flimsy arms, short legs and bad vision--with its powerful jaw and its mouthful of sharp, serrated teeth.

Home Turf: Africa - Madagascar

When It Lived: Late Cretaceous Period (about 70 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Majungatholus was at the top of the food chain in its region; it ate titanosaurs and other sauropod dinosaurs (gigantic, long-necked plant-eaters). When food was scarce, there is also evidence of scavenging and cannibalism.

Did You Know?:
By examining a 67-million-year-old Majungatholus fossil, scientists confirmed that therapod dinosaurs had respiratory systems similar to that of birds, with flexible air sacs that allow the lungs a constant supply of air instead of requiring inward and outward breaths (like mammals).

Megalodon
Megalodon

Name: Megalodon

Pronounced: MEG-a-la-don

Description:
Measuring up to 50 feet long and tipping the scales at up to 50 tons, the Megalodon, a shark, was probably two to three times larger than today's great white shark. Its name means "long tooth," and its teeth were not only long but huge all around, with serrated edges.

Fighting Style:
The Megalodon had an extremely sharp sense of smell and good eyesight; it was also very agile, which made it a lethal predator. After stalking and catching up to its victim, the Megalodon would use its rows of massive teeth to rip into its flesh. The shark would then retreat and allow its prey to lose blood, returning to attack again when the victim had become weaker.

Home Turf: Ocean waters around the world

When It Lived: Miocene and Pliocene Eras (roughly 25-5 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
The Megalodon was an apex predator, at the top of the food chain in its waters. Its prey probably ranged from victims as small as seals (100 pounds each) to much bigger animals, including giant squid, other large sharks and, especially, whales.

Did You Know?:
Sharks don't have bones, which makes it hard for paleontologists to estimate the Megalodon's size and shape. They did have some bony cartilage that fossilized, but most existing information about them comes from their teeth, which were replaceable. In guessing the size of the Megalodon, scientists estimate 10 feet for every inch of tooth.

Nanotyrannus
Nanotyrannus

Name: Nanotyrannus

Pronounced: nan-oh-tie-ran-us

Description:
Measuring up to five meters (16 feet) long and weighing about one ton, this "tiny tyrant" had a large head, a slim tail, long hind legs, short arms with two-fingered hands and large, strong jaws with sharp teeth.

Fighting Style:
Faster and more agile than the T-Rex, the Nanotyrannus had excellent vision and depth perception due to its large, forward-looking eyes. It could chase and overtake its victims with long, fast strides and wound them with its sharp claws and knife-like teeth.

Home Turf: North America - USA

When It Lived: Late Cretaceous Period (67-65 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Like other tyrannosaurs, Nanotyrannus probably preyed on the duck-billed, herbivorous hadrosaurs that were common in their region at the time.

Did You Know?:
Many paleontologists now believe that Nanotyrannus was in fact a juvenile Tyrannosaurus Rex and not a separate genus of dinosaur.

Pachyrhinosaurus
Pachyrhinosaurus

Name: Pachyrhinosaurus

Pronounced: pack-ee-RINE-oh-sore-us

Description:
Measuring up to six meters (almost 20 feet) long and weighing in at as much as four tons, Pachyrhinosaurus was one of the largest types of ceratopsid (or horned dinosaurs). Unlike other ceratopsids, however, the adult Pachyrhinosaurus didn't have a nose horn to go with the two horns on its brow. Instead, it had a large, wrinkly bone mass covering its nose, earning it its name, which means "thick-nosed lizard."

Fighting Style:
Pachyrhinosaurus probably lived and traveled in herds for feeding and protection reasons: When one dinosaur spotted a predator, he could alert the rest of the herd. Its primary weapon was its armored skull, which it used for ramming its attackers. When confronted with a predator, Pachyrhinosaurus would lower its head and charge forward, then raise its head up quickly and attempt to wound its opponent. Another distinctive ceratopsid feature--the bony headdress-like frill at its neck--could be used as protection for the rest of the body, which was unarmored and vulnerable.

Home Turf: North America - Canada

When It Lived: Late Cretaceous period (76-68 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
The giant Pachyrhinosaurus was herbivorous. It was preyed on by the giant carnivorous tyrannosaurids that shared its geographical range and time period, most notably the terrifying Albertosaurus.

Did You Know?:
In the 1980s, an entire herd of Pachyrhinosaurus skeletons was found in Alberta, Canada. Studying these fossils, especially those of baby and juvenile dinosaurs, helped paleontologists determine that the disappearance of the Pachyrhinosaurus' nose horn in favor of the bulbous nose was not a result of illness, as had previously been thought, but a normal characteristic that developed at the time of puberty.

Panthera
Panthera

Name: Panthera

Pronounced: Pan-thera

Description:
Panthera atrox, the North American lion of the Pleistocene Era, weighed in at about 700 to 800 pounds, stood five feet tall, and measured 11.5 feet long; it was about 25 percent larger than the modern African lion. It was probably plain-colored, not spotted, and lacked the mane common to modern male lions (although some may have had small manes). Panthera had long legs, five retractable claws on each of its four feet and powerful teeth and jaws, with a bite force of more than 1,800 pounds per square inch.

Fighting Style:
Panthera's long legs were nonetheless not designed for long distance chase, and its strategy for stalking its prey was to use cover and camouflage to get close enough to attack successfully. Once it got close, the lion would run in and use its powerful jaws to subdue its prey. It would also rely on its speed and quick reflexes to outmaneuver larger opponents, such as the giant bear.

Home Turf: North America

When It Lived: Late Pleistocene Era (10,000 years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Evidence shows that Panthera was (like Arctodus, the giant bear) an apex predator, at the top of the food chain in its habitat. It probably fought with Arctodus for food (such as bison, wild horses and other smaller animals) and for ultimate dominance of its range, in the harsh, rapidly changing climate of the Late Pleistocene era.

Did You Know?:
Though paleontologists have recovered several well-preserved specimens of Panthera from the tar pits at Rancho La Brea in Los Angeles, they were far less abundant than those of Smilodon fatalis, the saber-toothed cat. This relative shortage suggests that Panthera was probably more intelligent and thus able to avoid the tar traps that took the lives of so many Ice Age animals.

Stegosaurus
Stegosaurus

Name: Stegosaurus

Pronounced: STEG-oh-SORE-us

Description:
Measuring up to nine meters (29.5 feet) long, Stegosaurus weighed more than three tons. It had much shorter limbs in front than in back, so its back--which was lined with large bony triangular plates--appeared arched from the neck to the hip. Instead of claws, its hands and feet had evolved into broad, blunt-hoofed feet.

Fighting Style:
Based on the relative length of its front and back legs, it's clear that Stegosaurus was not a fast runner, but used its most distinctive feature--its plated hide--as armor to protect itself from attack. Evidence suggests that Stegosaurus was not merely a passive victim of attacks but used its spiked tail, known as a thagomizer, to fight back.

Home Turf: North America - USA

When It Lived: Late Jurassic Period (155-144 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
As shown by its leaf-shaped teeth, Stegosaurus ate only plants. Possible predators include any number of larger carnivorous dinosaurs of the period, including Allosaurus and Ceratosaurus.

Did You Know?:
In a 1982 Far Side comic strip, cartoonist Gary Larson drew a caveman professor telling his students that the spiky tail of a Stegosaurus was known as a "thagomizer" in honor of "the late Thag Simmons." Thanks to paleontologist Ken Carpenter, who liked the name and used it in his 1993 presentation of the most complete Stegosaurus skeleton ever found, the name has stuck.

Tenontosaurus
Tenontosaurus

Name: Tenontosaurus

Pronounced: ten-ON-toe-sore-us

Description:
Measuring up to seven meters (23 feet) long and weighing between one and two tons, Tenontosaurus (or "sinew lizard") spent most of its time on all fours; it had thicker front limbs than other iguanodontians (advanced beaked dinosaurs) in order to support its body weight.

Fighting Style:
Tenontosaurus was large but mostly defenseless, with no body armor to protect it from attack. Its size was its only defense; it was much larger than some of its predators, such as the raptor dinosaur Diononychus.

Home Turf: North America - Canada and USA

When It Lived: Early Cretaceous Period (120-110 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Tenotosaurus was a plant-eater that was targeted by predators such as Dinonychus, which hunted in packs in order to overwhelm the much larger Tenontosaurus. Numerous Diononychus fossils have been found buried with a single Tenontosaurus skeleton, suggesting that the raptors might not have survived the attack.

Did You Know?:
Because of their ability to evolve into different body types, iguanodotians were one of the most long-lived and diverse groups of ornithiscian dinosaurs. Tenontosaurus was one of the first to split off from the typical body type, growing considerably bigger than its relatives and walking on all fours.

Tyrannusaurus Rex
Tyrannusaurus Rex

Name: Tyrannosaurus Rex

Pronounced: tie-RAN-oh-sore-us

Description:
The "king of the tyrant lizards" walked on powerful hind legs with an almost horizontal posture and small forelimbs. It could weigh between six and seven tons and reach a length of 12 meters (39 feet).

Fighting Style:
T-Rex was relatively slow but agile; it would stay hidden and leap out to surprise its prey. Lacking vicious claws, it relied on its teeth, planting its feet and using its powerful neck and legs to stabilize itself and rip into its victim's flesh.

Home Turf: North America - Canada and USA

When It Lived: Late Cretaceous Period (67-65 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
T-Rex was at the top of the food chain in its region. Common victims were herbivorous duck-billed hadrosaurs, but it also likely preyed on horned dinosaurs known as ceratopsians, whose fossils have been found in the same areas, as well as on giant, long-necked sauropods.

Did You Know?:
One popular dinosaur myth (shown in the Disney movie Fantasia, for example) is that T-Rex faced off against another well-known dinosaur, the plated Stegosaurus. This is impossible, as Stegosaurus lived during the Late Jurassic period (150 million years ago) and was extinct by the time T-Rex was around.

Utahraptor
Utahraptor

Name: Utahraptor

Pronounced: YOO-tah-RAP-tor

Description:
Standing nearly six feet tall and weighing in at more than 1,500 pounds, the Utahraptor was the largest known deinonychosaur (popularly known as raptor dinosaurs). Its powerful forelimbs ended in three curved, blade-like claws, and it walked on two short, sturdy legs with sharp, sickle-like claws at their ends.

Fighting Style:
Like other dromoaesaurids, Utahraptor may have hunted in packs, which made it an even more fearsome predator. Fast-moving and agile, with excellent vision, the Utahraptor was nonetheless slower than smaller relatives such as Deinonychus or Velociraptor; it would probably have lain in wait, then pounced on the back of its victim, slashing and tearing apart its flesh with its sharp claws.

Home Turf: North America - USA

When It Lived: Early to Mid-Cretaceous Period (112-100 million years ago)

What's For Dinner?:
Utahraptor's prey possibly included very large herbivorous dinosaurs such as sauropods. When food was scarce, it would even take on the heavily armored ankylosaur Gastonia.

Did You Know?:
When it ran, the Utahraptor rotated its middle toe (the one outfitted with its lethal claw) upwards and ran on the other three toes.

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