History In The Headlines

Author: Jennie Cohen

Neanderthal

Introducing Your Inner Neanderthal

As evidence grows that many people may be part Neanderthal, get the facts on humans’ newfound ancestors.

Artifacts from Shipwreck

Ancient Medicines From Shipwreck Shed Light on Life in Antiquity

Researchers have used DNA sequencing to unlock the secrets of 2,000-year-old medicines found in a shipwreck.

Caligula

Caligula Statue Seized From Looters Is Unveiled

A statue thought to depict the notorious emperor Caligula may have led experts to a long-lost imperial palace.

Boremys Turtle

Survivors in a Half Shell: Turtles Withstood Dinosaur Die-Out

When an earth-shattering event triggered mass extinctions 65 million years ago, some turtles weren’t even shell-shocked, a new study suggests.

Famous Duels

History at 40 Paces: Legendary Duels

On the 207th anniversary of the duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, find out about this notorious incident and other famous standoffs.

Viking Teeth

Did Viking Warriors Bare Groovy Teeth?

Viking warriors raiding Britain may have filed their teeth to scare their enemies, according to archaeologists excavating a unique mass grave.

Fireworks

Fireworks’ Vibrant History

Find out about the history of fireworks, which will light up the skies across America this Independence Day.

Alamo

Cleaning of Alamo Reveals Historic Graffiti

Graffiti discovered at the Alamo earlier this month may be the oldest ever found at the site and could help shed light on its enigmatic past.

Frankincense Plant

A Wise Man’s Cure: Frankincense and Myrrh

Once considered priceless, the ancient remedies frankincense and myrrh are drawing new attention from medical researchers.

Camarasaurus

Dino Temperature Puzzle: Scientists Get Warmer

Large dinosaurs had warm blood but were not necessarily warm-blooded, according to an innovative new study.

whiter-bulger-thumb

Famous Gangster Informants in U.S. History

Find out about famous gangsters who became informants for the U.S. government, including the recently captured Whitey Bulger.

gladiator-thumb

Gladiator Cries Foul Over Ref’s Blown Call From the Grave

Did a referee’s blown call cost a Roman gladiator his life some 1,800 years ago?

Herculaneum

Eating As the Romans Ate

Residents of Herculaneum, a Roman city destroyed in 79 A.D., ate such delicacies as sea urchins, figs and dormice, according to a recent analysis of a sewer found on the site.