History In The Headlines

Author: Jennie Cohen

Jack the Ripper Autobiography

Jack the Ripper ‘Autobiography’ Hits Shelves

Written in the 1920s and rediscovered in 2008, memoirs supposedly written by the real Jack the Ripper were published today.

Medicinal Alcohol Prescription

Drink Some Whiskey, Call in the Morning: Doctors & Prohibition

During Prohibition, which took effect 93 years ago this week, many doctors boosted their practices by doling out medicinal alcohol.

William Wallace Letter

700-Year-Old William Wallace Letter Finally Reaches Scotland

A note of recommendation issued by King Philip IV of France and possibly carried by William Wallace will go on display this August at the Scottish Parliament.

Grooming Claw

Does Primitive Claw Disqualify So-Called ‘Missing Link’ Candidate?

Researchers found that the toes of a 47-million-year-old primate suggest a transitional phase from nails to claws—or vice versa.

Joan of Arc

7 Things You Didn’t Know About Joan of Arc

To commemorate Joan of Arc’s 600th birthday, explore some facts about the legendary “Maid of Orléans” that might come as a surprise.

Saber-Toothed Predators

Powerful Arms Saved Saber-Toothed Killers’ Fearsome Fangs, Study Shows

For prehistoric predators, long fangs and strong arms worked in perfect tandem to seize struggling prey.

jeanne-baret-thumb

First Woman to Circle the Globe Honored at Last

Scientists have finally named a species for botanist Jeanne Baret, who disguised herself as a man to become the first woman to circumnavigate the globe.

bill-of-rights-thumb

Facts About the Bill of Rights on Its 220th Anniversary

The first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution, known collectively as the Bill of Rights, became law on December 15, 1791.

Pyramid of the Sun

Offerings Discovered at Base of Teotihuacan’s Pyramid of the Sun

A trove of ceremonial offerings has been discovered under Teotihuacan’s Pyramid of the Sun, archaeologists announced Tuesday.

African Meeting House

African Meeting House, Oldest U.S. Black Church, Reopens After Restoration

Boston’s African Meeting House reopened last week after undergoing a meticulous restoration that returned the structure to its 19th-century appearance.

Ancient Bedding

World’s Oldest Known Beds Repelled Bugs

Just because our Stone Age predecessors lived in caves doesn’t mean they couldn’t appreciate soft, comfortable bedding 77,000 years ago.

Presidential Aging

Do U.S. Presidents Age Faster While in Office?

A human longevity expert assessed the longstanding theory that the stresses of the job make American presidents age more quickly.

London

17th-Century Londoners Died of Fright, Itch and Grief

A treatise by the pioneering statistician John Graunt, now on display at London’s Royal Society, provides a glimpse at life and death in the 1600s.