History In The Headlines

Author: Sarah Pruitt

A section of the fuselage recovered from Challenger (left) and the flight deck windows recovered from Columbia on display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. (Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett)

NASA Displays Challenger and Columbia Wreckage

For the first time, the public can now view debris from the Challenger and Columbia space shuttles, along with poignant personal mementoes representing the astronauts.

3-D renderings of the skeletons. (Credit: Smithsonian X 3D)

Archaeologists Excavate Graves of Jamestown’s Leaders

Inside the ruins of a church built in 1608, archaeologists have uncovered the remains of four men who helped found the first permanent English settlement in the New World.

A 2011 photo of members of the Mashco Piro tribe. (Credit: Reuters)

Peru Plans First Contact with Isolated Amazonian Tribe

In a controversial decision, the Peruvian government is planning to make contact for the first time with the Mashco Piro, a tribe living in the Amazon jungle.

Remains of an adult female buried with horse and cow bones. (Credit: Bournemouth University)

Iron Age Graves in Britain Yield Hybrid Animals and Human Sacrifice

Archaeologists excavating one of the oldest settlements in Britain have discovered the buried remains of bizarre animal hybrids, as well as an apparent human sacrifice.

A shot from New Horizons of Pluto and Charon taken on July 11, 2015. (Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI)

NASA Space Probe Makes Historic Pluto Flyby

After a journey of nine years and some 3 billion miles, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft flew by the dwarf planet Pluto and its five moons yesterday morning.

Fireworks explode around the Eiffel Tower on July 14, 2014 in Paris, France. (Credit: Frederic Stevens/WireImage)

The French Revolution: Fact or Fiction?

In honor of Bastille Day, explore some well-known “facts” about the French Revolution—some of which may not be so factual after all.

Harper Lee receives the 2007 Presidential Medal of Freedom in a ceremony at the White House. (Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Harper Lee Publishes First Novel in 55 Years

Amid heated controversy, Harper Lee’s much-anticipated second novel, “Go Set a Watchman,” is being released tomorrow, 55 years after “To Kill a Mockingbird” became a sensation.

vj day kiss1

One Mystery of a Famous Kiss is Solved…Thanks to Physics

A physicist and his colleagues used scientific analysis to pinpoint exactly when photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt snapped his iconic photo “V-J Day in Times Square.”

atocha coins

Treasures From Spanish Galleon Sunk in 1622 Set For Auction

Part of the large cache of treasure recovered from the wreck of a 400-year-old Spanish galleon near the Florida Keys will go on auction early next month.

monkey brain

Scientists Decode Secrets of 15-Million-Year-Old Monkey Brain

When scientists used 3-D computer imaging to examine the 15-million-year-old skull of an ancient Old World monkey, they discovered some intriguing things.

Steffi Graf during her Grand Slam run in 1988. (Credit: PL Gould/IMAGES/Getty Images)

Tennis’ Elusive Grand Slam

At Wimbledon, Serena Williams is pursuing her third straight major title on the way to a possible Grand Slam—a feat very few players in history have achieved.

stand watie

Who was Stand Watie?

One hundred fifty years ago, the controversial Native American chief Stand Watie—the last remaining Confederate general in the field during the Civil War—surrendered his army.

okinawa

Remembering the Battle of Okinawa, 70 Years Ago

The nearly three-month battle for Okinawa that ended on June 22, 1945 was the last—and the bloodiest—clash between Japanese and U.S. forces in the Pacific during World War II.