History In The Headlines

Author: Sarah Pruitt

stand watie

Who was Stand Watie?

One hundred fifty years ago, the controversial Native American chief Stand Watie—the last remaining Confederate general in the field during the Civil War—surrendered his army.

okinawa

Remembering the Battle of Okinawa, 70 Years Ago

The nearly three-month battle for Okinawa that ended on June 22, 1945 was the last—and the bloodiest—clash between Japanese and U.S. forces in the Pacific during World War II.

einstein letters

Einstein Letters Fetch More Than $420K at Auction

More than two dozen letters written by famed physicist Albert Einstein sold at auction this week, bringing in a total of some $420,625.

Credit: Laurent Mekul

Scientists Find Soft Tissue in 75-Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Bones

In a pile of unpromising dinosaur fossils dug up in Canada a century ago, British scientists find soft tissue materials preserved for some 75 million years.

amelia earhart 1

Newly Rediscovered Film Shows Amelia Earhart Shortly Before Fatal Flight

The film is believed to be the last surviving footage of the celebrated female aviator, who disappeared over the South Pacific in July 1937.

Artist's representation of the newly discovered Regaliceratops peterhewsi. (Credit: Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology)

New “Hellboy” Dinosaur Identified in Canada

Scientists in Alberta, Canada, have identified a new species of horned dinosaur, a cousin of Triceratops that sported a distinctive bony frill and facial horns.

Close-up of cannon recovered from HMS Erebus. (Credit: Parks Canada)

Relics of Long-Lost Shipwreck Unveiled

A collection of artifacts recovered from the wrecked HMS Erebus in Canada’s Queen Maud Gulf are all that remains of Sir John Franklin’s doomed expedition to the Arctic in 1845.

henry johnson

WWI Hero Henry Johnson Finally Receives Medal of Honor

Private Henry Johnson, a member of the all-black unit known as the “Harlem Hellfighters,” used a rifle, a knife and his hands to fight off nearly two dozen German soldiers during World War I.

oldest murder victim

Was This the First Murder Victim in History?

Scientists say a fossilized skull found inside a cave in Spain shows evidence that it belonged to the victim of a homicide—some 430,000 years ago.

John Scopes in the courtroom during his 1925 trial. (Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

90 Years Ago, Scopes (and Evolution) Indicted in Tennessee

On May 25, 1925, John T. Scopes—the defendant in the famous “Monkey Trial”—was indicted for teaching the theory of evolution in his high school science class.

William Travis' 18365 "Victory or Death" letter. (Courtesy of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission)

Travis Writes from the Alamo: “Victory or Death”

Surrounded by thousands of Mexican troops and facing near-certain death, Lieutenant Colonel William B. Travis wrote what is considered to be one of history’s most heroic letters.

ming dynasty tomb

Golden Ornaments Decorate Tomb of Ming Dynasty Duchess

A five-century-old tomb found underneath a construction site in Nanjing, China, was the final resting place of a Ming Dynasty duchess.

A mockup of the a $20 bill featuring Harriet Tubman. (Credit: Women on 20s)

Should Harriet Tubman Replace Jackson on the $20 Bill?

A grassroots campaign to put a woman from American history on the $20 has announced the results of an online poll to choose its desired candidate.