History In The Headlines

Author: Sarah Pruitt

Reproduction of a Neanderthal woman at the National Archaeological Museum in Madrid, Spain. (Credit: Cristina Arias/Cover/Getty Images)

New Study Suggests Neanderthals and Humans Co-Existed for Millennia

In a new study, researchers claim that Neanderthals and humans may have lived alongside each other in Europe for as many as 5,000 years.

Facial reconstruction of Richard III

The Royal Diet of Richard III Revealed

A new study reveals that medieval monarch Richard III truly ate–and drank–like a king during his brief time on the English throne.

egypthierarchy

Study Explores Rise of Egyptian Pharaohs

A new study reveals how a despotic system like ancient Egypt’s could have evolved from egalitarian hunter-gatherer societies.

cavity

New Research Drills Into History of Cavities

In two new studies, scientists analyzed teeth extracted from ancient skeletons in order to learn more about one of our most enduring health problems: cavities.

Body of Huldremose Woman

Uncovering the Mysteries of the Bog Bodies

Ongoing research on two 2,000-year-old corpses preserved in the peat bogs of Denmark reveals that they both traveled from elsewhere before their deaths.

cuneiform

Prehistoric Recordkeeping System Used Long After Writing Emerged

Recent archeological finds in Turkey suggest that ancient Assyrians relied on their prehistoric bookkeeping system for some 2,000 years after the advent of writing.

A photograph of Lyuba, the newborn woolly mammoth discovered in 2007. (Credit: Francis Latreille)

X-rays Provide Glimpse Into Short Lives of Baby Mammoths

X-ray scans of two baby mammoth skeletons found in Siberia help reveal in startling detail how the Ice Age animals lived and died.

Cranium of "Karabo," the Australopithecus sediba skeleton discovered in 2008. A. sediba had apelike arms and brains, but also modern human traits such as small teeth and longer legs.

Human Traits May Not Have Evolved All At Once, Scientists Say

After analyzing fossil evidence, a group of anthropologists now suggest that human evolution may have been even more complicated than we thought.

Declaration of Independence

Scholar Questions Key Period in Declaration of Independence

A potential error in the official transcript of the Declaration of Independence may have led to a misunderstanding of the Founding Fathers’ intent.

Divers visiting a World War I-era hospital barge off ANZAC Cove, near the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey. (Credit: M. Spencer)

Protection Sought for World War I Ships

A United Nations agreement will soon be extended to safeguard the underwater remains of hundreds of ships sunk during World War I.

The Qeswachaka Bridge, which spans the Apurímac River canyon along the Qhapaq Ñan . (Credit: Getty Images)

Countries Seek Official Protection for Ancient Inca Road

Six countries are lobbying the United Nations to grant protected status to the Qhapaq Ñan, a 3,000-year-old road that runs down the Pacific coast of South America.

Remains of victims of Plague of Cyprian, discovered in the funeral complex of Harwa and Akhimenru (Credit: N. Cijan/ Associazione Culturale per lo Studio dellEgitto e del Sudan ONLUS)

Ancient Plague Victims Found in Egypt

Archeologists in the ancient Egyptian city of Thebes have uncovered the victims of an infamous plague, which one writer at the time saw as a sign that the world was ending.

An artist’s rendering depicts the satellite ISEE-3/ICE during its planned lunar fly-by in August 2014. (Credit: Mark Maxwell/ISEE-3 Reboot Project)

After 36 Years, Spacecraft May Be Headed Home

Thanks to a determined group of civilians, a spacecraft launched in the 1970s and shut down by NASA in 1997 may finally be coming back into Earth’s orbit.