History In The Headlines

Author: Sarah Pruitt

Cranium of "Karabo," the Australopithecus sediba skeleton discovered in 2008. A. sediba had apelike arms and brains, but also modern human traits such as small teeth and longer legs.

Human Traits May Not Have Evolved All At Once, Scientists Say

After analyzing fossil evidence, a group of anthropologists now suggest that human evolution may have been even more complicated than we thought.

Declaration of Independence

Scholar Questions Key Period in Declaration of Independence

A potential error in the official transcript of the Declaration of Independence may have led to a misunderstanding of the Founding Fathers’ intent.

Divers visiting a World War I-era hospital barge off ANZAC Cove, near the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey. (Credit: M. Spencer)

Protection Sought for World War I Ships

A United Nations agreement will soon be extended to safeguard the underwater remains of hundreds of ships sunk during World War I.

The Qeswachaka Bridge, which spans the Apurímac River canyon along the Qhapaq Ñan . (Credit: Getty Images)

Countries Seek Official Protection for Ancient Inca Road

Six countries are lobbying the United Nations to grant protected status to the Qhapaq Ñan, a 3,000-year-old road that runs down the Pacific coast of South America.

Remains of victims of Plague of Cyprian, discovered in the funeral complex of Harwa and Akhimenru (Credit: N. Cijan/ Associazione Culturale per lo Studio dellEgitto e del Sudan ONLUS)

Ancient Plague Victims Found in Egypt

Archeologists in the ancient Egyptian city of Thebes have uncovered the victims of an infamous plague, which one writer at the time saw as a sign that the world was ending.

An artist’s rendering depicts the satellite ISEE-3/ICE during its planned lunar fly-by in August 2014. (Credit: Mark Maxwell/ISEE-3 Reboot Project)

After 36 Years, Spacecraft May Be Headed Home

Thanks to a determined group of civilians, a spacecraft launched in the 1970s and shut down by NASA in 1997 may finally be coming back into Earth’s orbit.

iStockphotos.com

Cold-Blooded or Warm-Blooded? Dinosaurs May Have Been in Between

In the long-running debate over whether dinosaurs were cold-blooded or warm-blooded, new research has suggested a middle ground.

sperm2

Scientists Find World’s Oldest Sperm

A team of paleontologists has discovered 17 million-year-old sperm inside tiny shrimp fossils encased in bat guano on the walls of a cave in Queensland, Australia.

washington monument

After 33 Months, Washington Monument Reopens to the Public

The Washington Monument welcomed visitors today for the first time in more than two-and-a-half years, after a painstaking restoration to repair earthquake damage.

urbancow/iStockphotos.com

Settlement in Stonehenge Area Goes Back 10,000 Years

Scientists announced they have discovered artifacts buried in Amesbury, the closest settlement to Stonehenge, dating all the way back to 8820 B.C.

tsetse fly

Scientists Decode Genome of Deadly Tsetse Fly

After a decade-long effort, an international team of scientists has cracked the genetic code of the tsetse fly, the bloodsucking insect that spreads African sleeping sickness.

Wrigley Field

Wrigley Field Hits the Century Mark

As the iconic Chicago ballpark celebrates its 100th birthday this week, explore some facts about its colorful history, and that of four other iconic sports venues.

earth

Scientists Spot an Earth-Size Planet 500 Light-Years Away

Astronomers studying data from NASA’s Kepler space-based telescope announce they have discovered a distant planet that appears remarkably similar to Earth.