History In The Headlines

Category: Archaeology

Excavations at the Binchester site (Credit: University of Durham)

Roman Ruins in Britain Hailed as “Pompeii of the North”

New discoveries at an ancient fort in County Durham offer an 1,800-year-old glimpse into daily life in Roman Britain.

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Prehistoric Recordkeeping System Used Long After Writing Emerged

Recent archeological finds in Turkey suggest that ancient Assyrians relied on their prehistoric bookkeeping system for some 2,000 years after the advent of writing.

Credit: Dr. Tamar Hodos/University of Bristol

Ancient Sumerian Relics Found in English Cupboard

When researchers at Britain’s University of Bristol were cleaning out a cupboard, they made a stunning discovery.

Remains of victims of Plague of Cyprian, discovered in the funeral complex of Harwa and Akhimenru (Credit: N. Cijan/ Associazione Culturale per lo Studio dellEgitto e del Sudan ONLUS)

Ancient Plague Victims Found in Egypt

Archeologists in the ancient Egyptian city of Thebes have uncovered the victims of an infamous plague, which one writer at the time saw as a sign that the world was ending.

urbancow/iStockphotos.com

Settlement in Stonehenge Area Goes Back 10,000 Years

Scientists announced they have discovered artifacts buried in Amesbury, the closest settlement to Stonehenge, dating all the way back to 8820 B.C.

Remote Control Drones

Can Drones Revolutionize Archaeology?

Learn how archaeologists are discovering the most ancient of artifacts utilizing the most high-tech of tools.

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New Study Reveals Source of Stonehenge Rocks

A new study of Stonehenge’s smaller rocks pinpoints their exact source, raising questions about how they may have been transported to the monument’s site.

Clovis-era tools originally discovered along with the remains of a one-year-old boy at a burial site in western Montana in 1968. (Credit: Sarah Anzic

Ancient Infant’s DNA Provides Key to Native American Ancestry

A new genetic study links Native Americans from both North and South America to the Clovis culture, which flourished in North America around 13,000 years ago.

One of the Land's End "archaeobunnies" (Credit: David Chapman Photography for Land's End Landmark)

Rabbits Unearth Ancient Treasures at English Landmark

Look out Indiana Jones. A family of burrowing rabbits, not a team of archaeologists, has discovered a trove of Bronze Age artifacts in England.

A skull excavated from a site near London's Liverpool Station in August 2013. (Credit: Andrew Winning/Corbis Images)

Grisly London Discovery May Be Proof of City’s Gladiators

New forensic research on 39 skulls unearthed in London may offer the first proof of Roman-era gladiators in the ancient city.

An ancient Buddha statue on display in Kabul museum in June 2013, following an extensive restoration process. (Credit: Massoud Hossaini/AFP/Getty Images)

Afghans Restore Museum Relics Destroyed by Taliban

With some help from abroad, the National Museum of Afghanistan has reassembled or recovered thousands of artifacts destroyed or stolen under Islamist rule.

Excavated wine cellar at Tel Kabri site. (Credit: Eric H. Cline, George Washington University)

One of History’s Oldest Wine Cellars Discovered

A 3,700-year-old storage room may have once contained roughly 3,000 bottles of wine.

Scientist's reconstruction of Ötzi the Iceman (Credit: Getty Images)

Europe’s Oldest Natural Mummy Has Living Relatives

The 5,300-year-old body of Ötzi the Iceman was discovered in the Italian Alps in 1991. Now, scientists have discovered he has at least 19 living Austrian descendants.