History In The Headlines

Category: Early Humans

tuberculosi

When Early Humans Left Africa, Tuberculosis Traveled With Them

New research indicates that tuberculosis bacteria originated with early humans some 70,000 years ago, before they migrated from their African homeland.

Neanderthals and Rabbits

Did Rabbits Kill the Neanderthals?

Neanderthals’ fate was sealed when they passed on a rabbit-rich diet, according to new research.

HITH-Neanderthal

Did Neanderthals Die Out Much Earlier Than We Thought?

A new study has cast doubt on a popular theory that Homo sapiens and Neanderthals once co-existed in Europe.

Neanderthal DNA

We May Not Be Part Neanderthal After All

Common ancestry, rather than interbreeding, could account for genetic similarities between humans and Neanderthals.

Homo Genus Diversity

Multiple Lines of Early Humans Coexisted in Africa, Study Suggests

Our most direct ancestors weren’t alone 2 million years ago, newly discovered fossils from Kenya indicate.

Neanderthal Arms

Big Neanderthal Arms Caused by Making Clothes, Study Suggests

Scraping animal hides, not hunting with spears, may have produced Neanderthals’ humerus asymmetry.

Tartar on the teeth of an Australopithecus sediba specimen. (Credit: Amanda Henry)

Human Ancestor Ate Leaves, Wood and Bark

Unlike other human ancestors, Australopithecus sediba foraged for tough, hard items like leaves, wood and bark, new research suggests.

Abri Castanet

Prehistoric French Artistes Painted Earliest Wall Art

Located in southwest France, a collapsed rock shelter might contain the oldest wall art ever discovered, a new study suggests.

meat-eating-thumb

Eating Meat Allowed Humans to Conquer Globe, Scientists Say

Eating meat may have allowed our ancestors to grow fruitful, multiply and spread across the planet, a new study suggests.

Early Fires

Human Ancestors Tamed Fire Earlier Than Thought

Campfire remains from a South African cave suggest fire control by early humans dates back 1 million years.

Red Deer Cave People

Did a New Human Species Thrive in Stone Age China?

Human remains with both modern and primitive features have been discovered in Chinese caves and might represent a new evolutionary line.

Altai

Native Americans Hailed From Siberian Highlands, DNA Reveals

Most scholars think that Native Americans’ ancestors trekked across the Bering Strait from Siberia, but aspects of the historic migration remain matters of debate.

Grooming Claw

Does Primitive Claw Disqualify So-Called ‘Missing Link’ Candidate?

Researchers found that the toes of a 47-million-year-old primate suggest a transitional phase from nails to claws—or vice versa.