Julius Caesar Suffered from Strokes, Not Epilepsy, New Study Says
April 20, 2015

A new examination of Julius Caesar’s health has found that the Roman dictator may have suffered from a series “mini-strokes” rather than epilepsy. Read More

New Research Drills Into History of Cavities
July 23, 2014

In two new studies, scientists analyzed teeth extracted from ancient skeletons in order to learn more about one of our most enduring health problems: cavities. Read More

Ancient Teeth Help Scientists Decode Plague
January 30, 2014

Though caused by the same pathogen, the deadly Plague of Justinian appears to have emerged separately from later plagues such as the Black Death. Read More

Remembering Albert Szent-Györgyi
September 16, 2011

September 16 marks the 118th birthday of Albert Szent-Györgyi, a Hungarian-born physiologist and biochemist who is honored in today’s Google Doodle. Read More

Did Skin Cream Kill Egypt’s Queen Hatshepsut?
August 19, 2011

The female pharaoh Hatshepsut might have accidentally poisoned herself with a carcinogenic skin treatment, according to a new study. Read More

Assistance Dogs: Learning New Tricks for Centuries
August 8, 2011

In honor of International Assistance Dog Week, we examine the history of canine companions’ role in helping people overcome disabilities. Read More

From Pope Urban VII to Bloomberg, Four Centuries of Smoking Bans
May 24, 2011

Bans on smoking and tobacco products have a long and complex history dating back to the late 16th century. Read More