History In The Headlines

Credit: Statens historiska museum / Christer Åhlin

Islamic Ring Found in 9th-Century Viking Grave

Discovered more than a century ago in a Swedish grave, a ring bearing an Arabic inscription confirms contact between the Vikings and the Islamic world.

Experts examine remains found in the Madrid crypt. (Credit: Madrid Region/EPA)

After 400 Years, Investigators Find Remains of Cervantes, Don Quixote’s Creator

A team of Spanish researchers believes it has found the long-lost remains of Miguel de Cervantes, author of “Don Quixote,” beneath a Madrid convent.

An empty frame stands where Rembrandt's '"The Storm on the Sea of Galilee" once was. (Credit: David L Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

History’s Biggest Art Heist Remains Unsolved, 25 Years Later

The largest art heist in history remains unsolved 25 years after thieves stole 13 masterpieces worth $500 million from a Boston museum. So whodunit?

Image of the Musashi captured by the underwater probe (Credit: Paul Allen)

WWII’s Largest Battleship Revealed After 70 Years Underwater

After an eight-year search, a research team sponsored by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen has discovered the shipwreck of the massive Japanese battleship Musashi.

Irish famine plot in Kenmare, County Cork. (Credit: Christopher Klein)

The Warship of Peace That Fed Famine-Stricken Ireland

On the eve of St. Patrick’s Day, revisit America’s first major foreign disaster relief effort when a warship delivered food to Ireland during the potato famine.

age of man

When Did the “Age of Man” Begin?

A new study suggests that the dramatic upheaval caused by European colonization of the Americas may have marked the beginning of a new period of geologic time.

Statues commemorating the Salt March in New Delhi, India. (Credit: Panoramic Images/Getty Images)

Gandhi’s Salt March, 85 Years Ago

Eighty-five years after Mahatma Gandhi conducted his famous Salt March, learn about one of the most legendary chapters in his campaign against British colonial rule in India.

A piece of jawbone discovered in the Ledi-Geraru research area in Ethiopia. (Credit: Minasse Wondimu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Discovery of Oldest Human Fossil Fills Evolutionary Gap

A newly unearthed fossil from Ethiopia is altering the timeline of human evolution, pushing it back by nearly a half-million years.

An early Constant Girard watch, one of the first mass-produced brands, created for German naval officers during World War I.

How World War I Led to the Apple Watch

Apple has unveiled its new smartwatch, but if not for a century-old war, the high-tech timepiece may never have been developed.

Rep. John Lewis stand on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, nearly 50 years after the brutal events of "Bloody Sunday." (Credit: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Selma’s “Bloody Sunday,” 50 Years Ago

On the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday,” look back at the assault on civil rights marchers in Selma, Alabama, that led to the Voting Rights Act.

michelangelo

9 Things You May Not Know About Michelangelo

On the 540th anniversary of his birth, learn nine surprising facts about the artist often called “the Divine One.”

Credit: Prisma/UIG/Getty Images

The Boston Massacre, 245 Years Ago

Two hundred and forty-five years after British troops shot and killed five colonists in Boston, take a look back at the tragic incident that helped galvanize support for American independence.

Abraham Lincoln delivers his second inaugural address at the U.S. Capitol on March 4, 1865, with John Wilkes Booth among the crowd looking on. (Credit: Library of Congress)

Remembering Lincoln’s Second Inauguration, 150 Years Later

On March 4, 1865, with the Civil War drawing to a close, Abraham Lincoln was sworn in to a second term as U.S. president; John Wilkes Booth was in attendance.