History In The Headlines

Burning of the White House, 1814 (Credit: White House Association)

The British Burn Washington, D.C., 200 Years Ago

As the War of 1812 neared its conclusion, British forces torched the White House, the Capitol and nearly every other public building in Washington.

Reproduction of a Neanderthal woman at the National Archaeological Museum in Madrid, Spain. (Credit: Cristina Arias/Cover/Getty Images)

New Study Suggests Neanderthals and Humans Co-Existed for Millennia

In a new study, researchers claim that Neanderthals and humans may have lived alongside each other in Europe for as many as 5,000 years.

Martha, the last passenger pigeon, being prepared for display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. (Credit: Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History)

The Last Days of the Passenger Pigeon, 100 Years Ago

It took only a century for the passenger pigeon to go from North America’s most abundant bird species to extinction.

augusuts

8 Things You May Not Know About Augustus

On the 2,000th anniversary of his death, get the facts on the first Roman emperor.

Facial reconstruction of Richard III

The Royal Diet of Richard III Revealed

A new study reveals that medieval monarch Richard III truly ate–and drank–like a king during his brief time on the English throne.

panama canal

7 Fascinating Facts About the Panama Canal

On the 100th anniversary of its opening, find out more about the famous waterway connecting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

Partial view of excavation site in Amphipolis, Greece (Credit: AP Photo/Alexander Michaliidis)

Tomb Dating From the Time of Alexander the Great Found in Northern Greece

The Greek government has announced that an “extremely important” tomb has been found in northern Greece, sparking speculation about who may be buried inside.

Alfred Hitchcock (Credit: Baron/Getty Images)

9 Things You May Not Know About Alfred Hitchcock

On the 115th anniversary of his birth, learn nine surprising facts about the man known as the big screen’s “Master of Suspense.”

sally ride

Navy Christens Research Ship Named for Sally Ride

The U.S. Navy has christened a new research vessel named in honor of the first American woman in space, Sally Ride.

egypthierarchy

Study Explores Rise of Egyptian Pharaohs

A new study reveals how a despotic system like ancient Egypt’s could have evolved from egalitarian hunter-gatherer societies.

Flanked by family members, Richard Nixon delivers farewell address in the East Room of the White House, August 9, 1974.

The Last Hours of the Nixon Presidency, 40 Years Ago

Forty years ago, Richard Nixon became the first president to resign from office. Read how his final hours in the White House unfolded.

French aerialist Philippe Petit walks on a cable suspended between the not-yet-completed twin towers of the World Trade Center, August 7, 1974. (Credit: Associated Press)

The Twin Towers High-Wire Walk, 40 Years Ago

Forty years ago, New York awoke to find Philippe Petit walking on a wire between the 110-story Twin Towers of the World Trade Center.

Credit: Robert Cieri/University of Utah

Lower Testosterone May Have Civilized Humanity, Study Says

A new study argues that humanity’s development of tools, art and culture may have coincided with lower levels of testosterone and a more feminine skull shape.