Suffrage and the Women Behind It Photo Gallery and related media

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Suffrage and the Women Behind It

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

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Along with the abolitionist and temperance activist Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton organized the first women's rights convention, which took place in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York. She served as the first president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association.

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