The "Vast Wasteland" of Television and related media

The "Vast Wasteland" of Television

On May 9, 1961, in a speech before a meeting of television executives, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Newton N. Minow characterizes television programming as a "vast wasteland" of senseless violence, mindless comedy and offensive advertising.

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Related Speeches & Audio (10)

  • The "Vast Wasteland" of Television
    The "Vast Wasteland" of Television

    Audio Clip (2:49)

    On May 9, 1961, in a speech before a meeting of television executives, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Newton N. Minow characterizes television programming as a "vast wasteland" of senseless violence, mindless comedy and offensive advertising.

    Audio Clip (2:49)
  • Violence Rocks 1968 Democratic Convention
    Violence Rocks 1968 Democratic Convention

    Audio Clip (0:17)

    In reaction to violence that broke out at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, Chicago Mayor Richard Daley defends his city's police, blaming instead the anti-Vietnam War demonstrators for the clash.

    Audio Clip (0:17)
  • Nixon's First Inaugural Address
    Nixon's First Inaugural Address

    Audio Clip (1:13)

    After losing his first presidential bid to John F. Kennedy in 1960, former Vice President Richard Nixon brought the Republican Party back into power with a win in the 1968 presidential election. On January 20, 1969, he takes the oath of office and promises to heal a divided nation.

    Audio Clip (1:13)
  • Lyndon Johnson's Inaugural Address
    Lyndon Johnson's Inaugural Address

    Audio Clip (2:02)

    On January 20, 1965, Lyndon B. Johnson began his first elected term as president of the United States. In his inaugural address, Johnson calls for the nation to unite toward a common goal.

    Audio Clip (2:02)
  • Geraldine Ferraro Joins the Democratic Ticket
    Geraldine Ferraro Joins the Democratic Ticket

    Audio Clip (2:13)

    After presidential candidate Walter Mondale announced Rep. Geraldine Ferraro as his choice for running mate on July 12, 1984, Ferraro addresses the audience at the Minnesota State Capitol. Ferraro was the first female vice presidential candidate to run on a major ticket.

    Audio Clip (2:13)
  • William Jennings Bryan Delivers Anti-Imperialism Speech
    William Jennings Bryan Delivers Anti-Imperialism Speech

    Audio Clip (2:08)

    At the Democratic Convention in Kansas City on August 8, 1900, William Jennings Bryan devotes his acceptance speech to his viewpoint on imperialism.

    Audio Clip (2:08)
  • Eagleton Withdraws Nomination for Vice Presidency
    Eagleton Withdraws Nomination for Vice Presidency

    Audio Clip (0:26)

    On July 31, 1972, at a Washington press conference, Sen. Thomas Eagleton announces his withdrawal as McGovern's running mate on the Democratic ticket. A news leak of prior psychiatric treatments led to his decision to drop out of the campaign.

    Audio Clip (0:26)
  • Election Night 2000
    Election Night 2000

    Audio Clip (1:14)

    With the voting results from Florida too close to call, NPR News is unable to announce a winner for U.S. president on November 7, 2000. The country will wait 36 more days before the contest between Republican candidate Gov. George W. Bush and Vice President Al Gore is decided.

    Audio Clip (1:14)
  • Reagan Accepts Presidential Nomination
    Reagan Accepts Presidential Nomination

    Audio Clip (1:33)

    After unsuccessfully seeking the presidential nomination in 1968 and 1976, Ronald Reagan was nominated at the Republican National Convention on September 7, 1980. In his acceptance speech, the former California governor tells American taxpayers that they do not exist to fund the federal government.

    Audio Clip (1:33)
  • Reagan's 1984 Presidential Nomination
    Reagan's 1984 Presidential Nomination

    Audio Clip (0:57)

    On August 23, 1984, President Ronald Reagan accepts his party's nomination for a second term. In his speech at the Republican National Convention, President Reagan promises a "springtime of hope" for America.

    Audio Clip (0:57)

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