Deep Throat Revealed and related media

Deep Throat Revealed

After more than 30 years of secrecy, the identity of Deep Throat, the Watergate informant who leaked information to the Washington Post that ultimately led to President Richard Nixon's resignation, is revealed in a Vanity Fair article written by John O'Connor. In a phone interview on May 31, 2005, O'Connor describes the reasons behind former FBI deputy Mark Felt's decision to finally go public.

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Related Speeches & Audio (3)

  • Deep Throat Revealed
    Deep Throat Revealed

    Audio Clip (1:22)

    After more than 30 years of secrecy, the identity of Deep Throat, the Watergate informant who leaked information to the Washington Post that ultimately led to President Richard Nixon's resignation, is revealed in a Vanity Fair article written by John O'Connor. In a phone interview on May 31, 2005, O'Connor describes the reasons behind former FBI deputy Mark Felt's decision to finally go public.

    Audio Clip (1:22)
  • Defense Department Condemns WikiLeaks
    Defense Department Condemns WikiLeaks

    Audio Clip (0:29)

    Following the posting of thousands of classified battlefield documents on the whistle-blowing website WikiLeaks, Defense Secretary Robert Gates denounces the action at a Pentagon news conference on July 29, 2010, saying that the leaks have endangered U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

    Audio Clip (0:29)
  • Reagan and Mondale in 1984 Presidential Debate
    Reagan and Mondale in 1984 Presidential Debate

    Audio Clip (1:15)

    On October 21, 1984, President Ronald Reagan and former Vice President Walter Mondale engage in their second nationally broadcast debate. When Henry Trewhitt of the Baltimore Sun asks the president about his advancing age, Reagan turns the question on its head by promising not to make an issue of his opponent’s youth and inexperience.

    Audio Clip (1:15)

Related Videos (1)

  • Cabinet Learns Kennedy Has Died
    Cabinet Learns Kennedy Has Died

    Video Clip (1:18)

    On November 22, 1963, White House Press Secretary Pierre Salinger was en route to Tokyo aboard a jet plane with six members of the Cabinet when he received the message that President John F. Kennedy had been shot. Shortly after, Navy Cmdr. Oliver Hallett calls Salinger from the Situation Room with the news that the president has died.

    Video Clip (1:18)

Related Photo Galleries (1)

  • Famous Leaks in U.S. History
    Famous Leaks in U.S. History

    6 Photos

    Throughout U.S. history, leaks have shaped public opinion and public policy, raising vital questions about the role of the press and the people’s right to know. These four rank among the best known leak scandals.

    (6 Photos)

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