Defense Department Condemns WikiLeaks and related media

Defense Department Condemns WikiLeaks

Following the posting of thousands of classified battlefield documents on the whistle-blowing website WikiLeaks, Defense Secretary Robert Gates denounces the action at a Pentagon news conference on July 29, 2010, saying that the leaks have endangered U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

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  • Defense Department Condemns WikiLeaks
    Defense Department Condemns WikiLeaks

    Audio Clip (0:29)

    Following the posting of thousands of classified battlefield documents on the whistle-blowing website WikiLeaks, Defense Secretary Robert Gates denounces the action at a Pentagon news conference on July 29, 2010, saying that the leaks have endangered U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

    Audio Clip (0:29)
  • Reagan and Mondale in 1984 Presidential Debate
    Reagan and Mondale in 1984 Presidential Debate

    Audio Clip (1:15)

    On October 21, 1984, President Ronald Reagan and former Vice President Walter Mondale engage in their second nationally broadcast debate. When Henry Trewhitt of the Baltimore Sun asks the president about his advancing age, Reagan turns the question on its head by promising not to make an issue of his opponent’s youth and inexperience.

    Audio Clip (1:15)
  • General MacArthur Dismissed
    General MacArthur Dismissed

    Audio Clip (1:30)

    In the April 27, 1951, episode of the radio program "Hear It Now," Edward R. Murrow relays the story of Gen. Douglas MacArthur's dismissal and the resulting arguments in Congress. Many Republicans claimed MacArthur was the victim of a smear campaign, including Sen. Richard Nixon, who is heard making accusations against the Pentagon.

    Audio Clip (1:30)
  • Deep Throat Revealed
    Deep Throat Revealed

    Audio Clip (1:22)

    After more than 30 years of secrecy, the identity of Deep Throat, the Watergate informant who leaked information to the Washington Post that ultimately led to President Richard Nixon's resignation, is revealed in a Vanity Fair article written by John O'Connor. In a phone interview on May 31, 2005, O'Connor describes the reasons behind former FBI deputy Mark Felt's decision to finally go public.

    Audio Clip (1:22)
  • Korean War Battlefield Report
    Korean War Battlefield Report

    Audio Clip (2:50)

    A September 14, 1950, a live report from the battlefield by combat correspondent Ens. Jack Seigal captures the U.S. Marines landing at Wolmi Do Island in Ichon Harbor, Korea.

    Audio Clip (2:50)

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