Eisenhower Welcomes Khrushchev to the U.S. and related media

Eisenhower Welcomes Khrushchev to the U.S.

On September 15, 1959, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, promising an open heart and good intentions, began an unprecedented tour of the United States. President Eisenhower expresses his hopes upon Khrushchev's arrival for improved relations between the two superpowers.

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Related Speeches & Audio (10)

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    Audio Clip (1:38)

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