First Speech Broadcast by Satellite and related media

First Speech Broadcast by Satellite

On August 12, 1960, NASA launched the world's first satellite into orbit. A message previously recorded by President Eisenhower was bounced off the Echo 1 and picked up by radio operators across the nation.

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Related Speeches & Audio (10)

  • First Speech Broadcast by Satellite
    First Speech Broadcast by Satellite

    Audio Clip (1:43)

    On August 12, 1960, NASA launched the world's first satellite into orbit. A message previously recorded by President Eisenhower was bounced off the Echo 1 and picked up by radio operators across the nation.

    Audio Clip (1:43)
  • Eisenhower on the Salk Polio Vaccine
    Eisenhower on the Salk Polio Vaccine

    Audio Clip (2:44)

    Two years after American medical researcher Jonas Salk reported that he had successfully tested a vaccine against poliomyelitis, polio vaccinations were still not widely available in the United States. To assuage the public's concerns, President Eisenhower holds a press conference on May 4, 1955, and explains the need for further testing.

    Audio Clip (2:44)
  • Eisenhower on Atomic Energy
    Eisenhower on Atomic Energy

    Audio Clip (1:59)

    On December 8, 1953, President Dwight D. Eisenhower addresses the General Assembly of the United Nations on the peaceful use of atomic energy.

    Audio Clip (1:59)
  • Ford Phones Apollo Astronauts
    Ford Phones Apollo Astronauts

    Audio Clip (8:14)

    On July 17, 1975, President Gerald Ford speaks by telephone to the Apollo astronauts following their rendezvous and docking with the Russian Soyuz spacecraft. This was the first joint orbital mission between the two superpowers, and it helped pave the way for further cooperation in the exploration of space.

    Audio Clip (8:14)
  • Nixon Calls Apollo 11 Astronauts
    Nixon Calls Apollo 11 Astronauts

    Audio Clip (1:56)

    In what he described as the most historic phone call ever made from the White House, President Richard Nixon speaks to astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin shortly after they became the first humans to set foot on the moon on July 20, 1969.

    Audio Clip (1:56)
  • Eisenhower Proclaims Alaska the 49th State
    Eisenhower Proclaims Alaska the 49th State

    Audio Clip (1:04)

    On January 3, 1959, President Eisenhower presides over the ceremony welcoming the territory of Alaska into the Union as the 49th and largest state.

    Audio Clip (1:04)
  • Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. on Abraham Lincoln
    Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. on Abraham Lincoln

    Audio Clip (1:33)

    As the principal speaker at the National Republican Club's 1957 Lincoln Day Dinner, Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. discusses the continuing appeal of the 16th president.

    Audio Clip (1:33)
  • Eisenhower on the Second Berlin Crisis
    Eisenhower on the Second Berlin Crisis

    Audio Clip (1:11)

    In November 1958, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev demanded that Western forces pull out of West Berlin in six months. On March 16, 1959, in a radio and television report to the American people, President Eisenhower speaks of the escalating Cold War tensions over Berlin, stressing that the United States will not give in to pressure from the USSR.

    Audio Clip (1:11)
  • Eisenhower on the Suez Canal Crisis
    Eisenhower on the Suez Canal Crisis

    Audio Clip (4:03)

    In October 1956, Britain and France entered into a coalition with Israel, and the three nations launched a military attack against Egyptian forces in the Suez Canal. On October 31, in a speech to the nation, President Eisenhower expresses the United States' opposition to the military action.

    Audio Clip (4:03)
  • Eisenhower Returns From Cancelled Summit Meeting
    Eisenhower Returns From Cancelled Summit Meeting

    Audio Clip (4:19)

    On May 1, 1960, an American U-2 high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft was shot down over central Russia. As a result, the Paris Summit Conference, scheduled 13 days later, collapsed. Upon his return from the failed conference on May 20, President Eisenhower addresses the welcoming crowd at Andrews Air Force Base.

    Audio Clip (4:19)

Related Videos (8)

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    After some misinterpreted comments by President Eisenhower about Nixon that JFK used in a campaign ad against his opponent (Nixons Experience), Eisenhower fully endorses Nixon. But it was too little, too late. JFK won the election, by a slim margin.

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  • Campaign Spot: Ike For President (1952)
    Campaign Spot: Ike For President (1952)

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    Up until Eisenhower, presidential candidates used tv for 30-minute speeches only. The idea for the celebrated WWII generals spots came from Madison Avenue ad exec Rossier Reeves, who had created M&Ms Melts in your mouth, not in your hands campaign. Reeves convinced Eisenhower that short spots placed before or after popular tv shows, such as I Love Lucy, would reach more viewers.

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  • Campaign Spot: Convention (1968)
    Campaign Spot: Convention (1968)

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    For his second run for the presidency, Nixon hired filmmaker Eugene Jones to produce ads that captured the turbulence and unrest in the nation at the time. Convention was one in a series -- mimicking the uneasy mood and tension in the US, suggesting that Nixon was the only man to bring the country together again.

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  • Campaign Spot: McGovern Defense (1972)
    Campaign Spot: McGovern Defense (1972)

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    In this ad, McGoverns defense cuts are criticized, questioning the candidates priorities for national security.

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  • Campaign Spot: China (1972)
    Campaign Spot: China (1972)

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    One of Nixons lasting legacies was his trip to China to normalize relations between the two countries which had been cut off for 20 years. No American president had ever visited China. Nixons tip signaled a major change -- for both America and Chinas policies. And for Republicans, a huge reason to re-elect their candidate.

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    Similar to Convention, Nixon points out Americas major frustrations and links them to breakdowns in the Democratic leadership.

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  • Campaign Spot: Peace (1976)
    Campaign Spot: Peace (1976)

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    Gerald Ford took office after Nixon resigned in 1973. Ford attempted to distance himself from the Nixon presidency, showcasing himself as a normal guy. His campaign focused on an upbeat, positive view of America.

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    Frank Drake and the Founding of SETI

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    Using a radio antenna focused on two stars, Frank Drake began a search for extra-terrestrial intelligence.

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