Gerald R. Ford Pardons Richard Nixon and related media

Gerald R. Ford Pardons Richard Nixon

In a live broadcast on September 8, 1974, President Gerald Ford grans his disgraced predecessor, Richard Nixon, a "full free and absolute pardon." In an effort to end speculation over whether he had cut a "deal" with Nixon, Ford emphatically stated he'd given the pardon to heal the nation.

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Related Speeches & Audio (10)

  • Gerald R. Ford Pardons Richard Nixon
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    Audio Clip (0:53)

    In a live broadcast on September 8, 1974, President Gerald Ford grans his disgraced predecessor, Richard Nixon, a "full free and absolute pardon." In an effort to end speculation over whether he had cut a "deal" with Nixon, Ford emphatically stated he'd given the pardon to heal the nation.

    Audio Clip (0:53)
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