Lee de Forest on His Contribution to Radio and related media

Lee de Forest on His Contribution to Radio

Known as the father of the radio, Lee de Forest describes his 1906 invention of the thermionic valve and its place in the development of the radio.

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Related Speeches & Audio (6)

  • Lee de Forest on His Contribution to Radio
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    Audio Clip (3:43)

    Known as the father of the radio, Lee de Forest describes his 1906 invention of the thermionic valve and its place in the development of the radio.

    Audio Clip (3:43)
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