Obama Nominates Sonia Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court and related media

Obama Nominates Sonia Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court

On May 26, 2009, President Barack Obama announces his nomination of Sonia Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court. When Sotomayor was sworn in on August 8, she became the first Hispanic justice to serve on the Supreme Court.

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Related Speeches & Audio (10)

  • Obama Nominates Sonia Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court
    Obama Nominates Sonia Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court

    Audio Clip (0:56)

    On May 26, 2009, President Barack Obama announces his nomination of Sonia Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court. When Sotomayor was sworn in on August 8, she became the first Hispanic justice to serve on the Supreme Court.

    Audio Clip (0:56)
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    After many unfruitful telephone conversations with Mississippi Gov. Ross Barnett, President John F. Kennedy calls the governor one more time to discuss the building tension over James Meredith’s impending registration at the University of Mississippi. Though the governor has made clear his opposition to the Supreme Court order to allow Meredith to attend the school, President Kennedy tries to assess whether the governor will maintain law and order when Meredith arrives.

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    Brown v. Board of Education Ruling

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    On May 17, 1954, U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren delivered the unanimous ruling against the "separate but equal" mandate and demanded desegregation of schools. Outside the courtroom, the attorneys who argued the Brown v. Board of Education case, James Nabrit Jr., Thurgood Marshall and George Hayes, give a press conference.

    Audio Clip (1:02)
  • Anita Hill Accuses Clarence Thomas
    Anita Hill Accuses Clarence Thomas

    Audio Clip (4:32)

    In October 1991, while the Senate Judiciary Committee was deliberating over the final vote on U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, Anita Hill stepped forward with accusations of sexual harassment against Thomas. As a result, the committee held three days of investigative hearings. In her nationally televised and broadcast statement, Hill testifies about the alleged harassment.

    Audio Clip (4:32)
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    Lyndon Johnson and Robert McNamara Plan Airstrikes in Vietnam

    Audio Clip (3:31)

    In a recorded phone call on February 26, 1965, Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara and President Lyndon B. Johnson discuss possible airstrikes in Vietnam.

    Audio Clip (3:31)
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    Lady Bird Johnson Critiques the President

    Audio Clip (2:30)

    President Lyndon B. Johnson holds a press conference on March 7, 1964, and takes questions on a range of topics, from the pending civil rights bill to the war in Vietnam. Afterward, in a recorded conversation with the president, Lady Bird Johnson evaluates her husband’s performance and awards him a “B+.”

    Audio Clip (2:30)
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    Clarence Thomas Refutes Anita Hill's Charges

    Audio Clip (3:22)

    U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas' confirmation hearings took a dramatic turn when he was accused of sexual harassment. In his opening statement on October 11, 1991, Thomas denies the charges brought against him by law professor Anita Hill, who claimed Thomas had sexually harassed her when she worked for him at the U.S. Department of Education.

    Audio Clip (3:22)
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    Lyndon Johnson Gets News About Missing Civil Rights Workers

    Audio Clip (4:00)

    On June 23, 1964, the burned car of three missing civil rights workers who had disappeared in Mississippi —James Chaney, Mickey Schwerner and Andrew Goodman—was discovered. In a recorded phone call later that day, FBI director J. Edgar Hoover delivers the news to President Lyndon B. Johnson. While Johnson holds out hope that the three men may still be alive, Hoover suspects the worst.

    Audio Clip (4:00)
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    Chicago Seven Trial

    Audio Clip (1:39)

    During a press conference on October 14, 1969, Tom Hayden, one of the defendants in the trial of the Chicago Seven, offers his view on prosecutor Thomas Foran's most recent accusations. The Chicago Seven—Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, David Dellinger, Tom Hayden, Rennie Davis, John Froines, and Lee Weiner—were charged with conspiracy and inciting to riot for their participation in the Vietnam War protests at the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

    Audio Clip (1:39)
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    John F. Kennedy Sets Sights on Moon

    Audio Clip (1:18)

    In an address at Rice University on September 12, 1962, President John F. Kennedy rallies support for the race to space by telling his fellow Americans that the reason we endeavor to go to the moon is "not because it is easy, but because it is hard."

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