December 23, 1948 : Japanese war criminals hanged in Tokyo

Introduction

In Tokyo, Japan, Hideki Tojo, former Japanese premier and chief of the Kwantung Army, is executed along with six other top Japanese leaders for their war crimes during World War II. Seven of the defendants were also found guilty of committing crimes against humanity, especially in regard to their systematic genocide of the Chinese people.

On November 12, death sentences were imposed on Tojo and the six other principals, such as Iwane Matsui, who organized the Rape of Nanking, and Heitaro Kimura, who brutalized Allied prisoners of war. Sixteen others were sentenced to life imprisonment, and the remaining two of the original 25 defendants were sentenced to lesser terms in prison.

Unlike the Nuremberg trial of German war criminals, where there were four chief prosecutors representing Great Britain, France, the United States, and the USSR, the Tokyo trial featured only one chief prosecutor–American Joseph B. Keenan, a former assistant to the U.S. attorney general. However, other nations, especially China, contributed to the proceedings, and Australian judge William Flood Webb presided. In addition to the central Tokyo trial, various tribunals sitting outside Japan judged some 5,000 Japanese guilty of war crimes, of whom more than 900 were executed.

Article Details:

December 23, 1948 : Japanese war criminals hanged in Tokyo

  • Author

    History.com Staff

  • Website Name

    History.com

  • Year Published

    2010

  • Title

    December 23, 1948 : Japanese war criminals hanged in Tokyo

  • URL

    http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/japanese-war-criminals-hanged-in-tokyo

  • Access Date

    November 17, 2017

  • Publisher

    A+E Networks