August 10, 1821 : New state west of the Mississippi

Introduction

Missouri enters the Union as the 24th state–and the first located entirely west of the Mississippi River.

Named for one of the Native American groups that once lived in the territory, Missouri became a U.S. possession as part of the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. In 1817, Missouri Territory applied for statehood, but the question of whether it would be slave or free delayed approval by Congress. In 1820, the Missouri Compromise was reached, admitting Missouri as a slave state but excluding slavery from the other Louisiana Purchase lands north of Missouri’s southern border. Missouri’s August 1821 entrance into the Union as a slave state was met with disapproval by many of its citizens.

In 1861, when other slave states seceded from the Union, Missouri chose to remain; although a provincial government was established in the next year by Confederate sympathizers. During the war, Missourians were split in their allegiances, supplying both Union and Confederate forces with troops. Lawlessness persisted during this period, and Missouri-born Confederate guerrillas such as Jesse James continued this lawlessness after the South’s defeat. With the ratification of Missouri’s new constitution by the citizens of the state in 1875, the old divisions were finally put to rest.

Article Details:

August 10, 1821 : New state west of the Mississippi

  • Author

    History.com Staff

  • Website Name

    History.com

  • Year Published

    2010

  • Title

    August 10, 1821 : New state west of the Mississippi

  • URL

    http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/new-state-west-of-the-mississippi

  • Access Date

    November 22, 2017

  • Publisher

    A+E Networks