March 25, 1955 : U.S. Customs seizes Howl

Introduction

The U.S. Customs Department confiscates 520 copies of Allen Ginsberg’s book Howl, which had been printed in England. Officials alleged that the book was obscene.

City Lights, a publishing company and bookstore in San Francisco owned by poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti, proceeded to publish the book in the fall of 1956. The publication led to Ferlinghetti’s arrest on obscenity charges. Ferlinghetti was bailed out by the American Civil Liberties Union, which led the legal defense. Nine literary experts testified at the trial that the poem was not obscene, and Ferlinghetti was found not guilty.

Howl, which created a literary earthquake among the literary community when Ginsberg first read the poem in 1955, still stands as an important monument to the countercultural fervor of the late 1950s and ’60s. Ginsberg stayed at the forefront of numerous liberal movements throughout his life and became a well-loved lecturer at universities around the country. He continued to write and read poetry until his death from liver cancer in 1997.

Article Details:

March 25, 1955 : U.S. Customs seizes Howl

  • Author

    History.com Staff

  • Website Name

    History.com

  • Year Published

    2009

  • Title

    March 25, 1955 : U.S. Customs seizes Howl

  • URL

    http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/u-s-customs-seizes-howl

  • Access Date

    November 23, 2017

  • Publisher

    A+E Networks