Condoleeza Rice Remembers MLK and related media

Condoleeza Rice Remembers MLK (1:42)

Former Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice recalls her memories of Martin Luther King, Jr.

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    "...All that I really knew to do at the time was to call upon my own analytic instincts. When a major player is hurt, you can't forfeit the game. You have to toughen up and buckle up, take a deep breath, and keep playing even in that player's name. You have to continue..."

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    On April 5, 1968, in a press conference held the day after the slaying of Martin Luther King Jr., civil rights activist Stokely Carmichael predicts the outbreak of more violence across the nation in retaliation for "white America's biggest mistake."

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  • Robert F. Kennedy Calls Governor of Mississippi
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    On September 29, 1962, as measures are taken to safely transport James Meredith to the University of Mississippi where he will enroll in accordance with a U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding desegregation of the institution, President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy make a series of phone calls to Gov. Ross Barnett who has openly defied the Court's ruling. Attorney General Kennedy gets exasperated when the governor shoots down his idea for crowd control.

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    When Mississippi Gov. Ross Barnett refused to comply with the U.S. Supreme Court ruling demanding desegregation at the University of Mississippi and the admittance of James Meredith, President John F. Kennedy was forced to intervene. In his address to the nation on September 30, 1962, Kennedy explains his decision to federalize the state national guard in order to maintain law and order while Meredith registers at the college.

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  • John F. Kennedy Intervenes in James Meredith Case
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    In defiance of the Supreme Court ruling that the University of Mississippi desegregate and allow James Meredith to attend, Gov. Ross Barnett physically blocked the African-American student from entering the building to register on September 20, 1962. Nine days later, President John F. Kennedy telephones Barnett to persuade him to cooperate with the Court's ruling. Barnett does little to reassure Kennedy, and attempts to pawn off the decision on his lawyer friend Tom Watkins.

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  • Secret Service Communicates During Reagan Assassination Attempt
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    On March 30, 1980, two months after he took office, President Reagan was shot by John W. Hinckley Jr. in an assassination attempt. The Secret Service communicates by radio as the scene unfolds, first describing Reagan (code-named Rawhide) as being okay, then coming to the realization that he is hurt and must be taken to the hospital.

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  • Eisenhower Intervenes in Little Rock Crisis
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    President Dwight D. Eisenhower is forced to take action when nine African-American students are prevented from entering Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. In a broadcast to the nation on September 24, 1957, the president explains his decision to order Federal troops to Little Rock to ensure that the students are allowed access to the school, as mandated by the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board of Education.

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    U.S. Capitol Shooting of March 1954

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    On March 1, 1954, five Congressmen were shot when a gang of Puerto Rican Nationalists opened fire on the House of Representatives. News coverage of the event reveals suspicions that the shooters are part of the same group that attempted the assassination of President Harry Truman in November 1950.

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  • Eyewitness Gives Account of January 2011 Tucson Rampage
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    An eyewitness to the January 8, 2011, shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and 13 others recounts the tragedy as it unfolded. In the assassination attempt, the gunman, later identified as Jared L. Loughner, shot Rep. Giffords in the head and killed six others in a group gathered for a town hall-style event outside a supermarket in Tucson, Arizona.

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