Globe Shows Ocean Floor and related media

Globe Shows Ocean Floor (1:59)

Marie Tharp's papers in the Geography and Map Division contain more than 32,000 pieces including a handmade globe of the earth showing the ocean floor and the location of the mid-Atlantic Ocean ridge.

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