Snapshots of Amelia Earhart’s Legendary Life

Introduction

American aviator Amelia Earhart not only set flying records, but also championed the advancement of women in aviation.

First woman to make a transatlantic flight

Amelia Earhart in a Parade reception after her Trans-Atlantic Flight in 1928 with pilots Wilmer Stultz and Luis Gordon. (Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)
Amelia Earhart in a Parade reception after her Trans-Atlantic Flight in 1928 with pilots Wilmer Stultz and Luis Gordon. (Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)

In 1928 Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic as a passenger with pilots Wilmer Stultz and Luis Gordon. With this feat she gained international attention, providing an opportunity for her to become a professional aviator. To celebrate this momentous occasion, a parade was thrown in New York City.

Soared into the record books

Amelia Earhart just before setting a new speed record for flyers. (Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)
Amelia Earhart just before setting a new speed record for flyers. (Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)

In 1922, Earhart soared into the record books, setting the world record for women when she became the first woman to fly solo at the altitude of 14,000 feet.

Breaks flying speed record

Amelia Earhart after setting an altitude record. (Credit: George Rinhart/Corbis via Getty Images)
Amelia Earhart after setting an altitude record. (Credit: George Rinhart/Corbis via Getty Images)

On July 5, 1930, Earhart set another record—this time it was for flying speed. Her plane, Lockheed, reached 184.mph (the record was 156mph).

President of Ninety Nines

Flyers Amelia Earhart Putnam, Frances H. Marsalis, Elvy Kalep, and Betty Gillies rehearsing for a skating party that was held in a hangar by the "Ninety Nines." (Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)
Flyers Amelia Earhart Putnam, Frances H. Marsalis, Elvy Kalep, and Betty Gillies rehearsing for a skating party to be held in a hangar by the “Ninety Nines.” (Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)

From 1931–33 Earhart served as the president of the Ninety Nines, an international organization for the advancement of female pilots. Here, Amelia Earhart Putnam, Frances H. Marsalis, Elvy Kalep and Betty Gillies are shown
rehearsing for a skating party to be held in a hangar. The organization still exists today and represents women flyers from 44 countries.

Receives the National Geographic Society medal

President Herbert Hoover presenting the National Geographic Society gold medal to Amelia Earhart in recognition of her continuous solo flight across the Atlantic. (Credit: Bettmann/ Getty Images)
President Herbert Hoover presenting the National Geographic Society gold medal to Amelia Earhart in recognition of her continuous solo flight across the Atlantic. (Credit: Bettmann/ Getty Images)

On June 21, 1932, President Hoover presented Earhart with Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society at the White House in recognition of her being the first woman (and the only person since Charles Lindbergh) to complete a solo transatlantic flight.

First non-stop transcontinental flight

Amelia Earhart as she arrived at Newark Airport after setting the record for non-stop flight for women.  (Credit: Joe Petrella/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
Amelia Earhart as she arrived at Newark Airport after second record for non-stop flight for women. (Credit: Joe Petrella/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)

In August 1932, Earhart completed the first non-stop transcontinental flight by a woman, also setting a new long distance record (just over 19 hours from LA to Newark). Here Earhart is shown as she arrives at Newark Airport after setting the record.

Soaring above the Golden Gate Bridge

The Lockheed Electra 'Flying Laboratory', piloted by American aviator Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan, over the Golden Gate bridge in California, at the start of a planned round-the-world flight. (Credit: Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
The Lockheed Electra ‘Flying Laboratory’, piloted by American aviator Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan, over the Golden Gate bridge in California, at the start of a planned round-the-world flight. (Credit: Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, fly in the Lockheed Electra (“Flying Laboratory”) over the Golden Gate bridge in California in 1937, heading towards Honolulu on the first leg of her first attempt at a round-the-world flight.

The last, fateful flight

Pilot Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, with a map of the Pacific that shows the planned route of their last flight. (Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)
Pilot Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, with a map of the Pacific that shows the planned route of their last flight. (Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)

Earhart and Noonan with a map of the Pacific that shows the planned route of their last, fateful flight.

Article Details:

Snapshots of Amelia Earhart’s Legendary Life

  • Author

    Brynn Holland

  • Website Name

    History.com

  • Year Published

    2017

  • Title

    Snapshots of Amelia Earhart’s Legendary Life

  • URL

    http://www.history.com/news/snapshots-of-amelia-earharts-legendary-life

  • Access Date

    November 22, 2017

  • Publisher

    A+E Networks