Herbert Hoover Campaigns for Reeelection and related media

Herbert Hoover Campaigns for Reeelection

In his 1932 acceptance speech for the Republican nomination for president, President Herbert Hoover promises to continue his reconstruction efforts if he has a chance at a second term.

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Related Speeches & Audio (10)

  • Herbert Hoover Campaigns for Reeelection
    Herbert Hoover Campaigns for Reeelection

    Audio Clip (2:03)

    In his 1932 acceptance speech for the Republican nomination for president, President Herbert Hoover promises to continue his reconstruction efforts if he has a chance at a second term.

    Audio Clip (2:03)
  • Herbert Hoover Accepts 1932 Nomination
    Herbert Hoover Accepts 1932 Nomination

    Audio Clip (6:59)

    In 1928, Herbert Hoover was elected president of the United States in a landslide Republican victory over Governor Alfred E. Smith of New York.

    Audio Clip (6:59)
  • Newt Gingrich Addresses the 104th Congress
    Newt Gingrich Addresses the 104th Congress

    Audio Clip (6:30)

    On opening day, January 4, 1995, Congress convened with the Republican Party in control of both the House of Representatives and the Senate. Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich kicks off the historical session by reciting the Republican Contract With America.

    Audio Clip (6:30)
  • Darlington Hoopes on Social Justice
    Darlington Hoopes on Social Justice

    Audio Clip (3:07)

    As 1944 running mate to presidential candidate Norman Thomas, vice president hopeful Darlington Hoopes of Pennsylvania delivers a speech about his stand as a member of the Socialist Party.

    Audio Clip (3:07)
  • JFK Announces Candidacy for Presidency
    JFK Announces Candidacy for Presidency

    Audio Clip (1:00)

    In 1960, John F. Kennedy announced his bid for the presidency when a reporter asked him if he was a candidate for the Democratic nomination for vice president.

    Audio Clip (1:00)
  • Kennedy and Nixon's Fourth Presidential Debate
    Kennedy and Nixon's Fourth Presidential Debate

    Audio Clip (5:39)

    On October 21, 1960, Sen. John F. Kennedy and Vice President Richard Nixon took part in the last of a series of the first televised presidential debates in U.S. history.

    Audio Clip (5:39)
  • Johnson Runs for President in 1960
    Johnson Runs for President in 1960

    Audio Clip (2:23)

    After weeks of campaigning, Sen. Lyndon Johnson of Texas officially announces his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination at a press conference on July 5, 1960. But by July 14, after a poor first-ballot showing against Sen. John F. Kennedy, Johnson accepted a second-place role, becoming his former rival's running mate.

    Audio Clip (2:23)
  • Johnson Will Not Seek Reelection
    Johnson Will Not Seek Reelection

    Audio Clip (0:38)

    Facing a country sharply divided over the Vietnam War, President Lyndon B. Johnson announces in a national television and radio broadcast on March 31, 1968, that he will not seek reelection to the presidency.

    Audio Clip (0:38)
  • Nixon Wins Presidency
    Nixon Wins Presidency

    Audio Clip (0:39)

    Audio Clip (0:39)
  • Nixon Declines Candidacy in 1964
    Nixon Declines Candidacy in 1964

    Audio Clip (0:49)

    On July 13, 1964, the Republican Party convened at the National Convention in San Francisco to nominate their candidates for the presidency and vice presidency. Though he had flirted with the idea of running for president during the pre-primary period, Richard Nixon makes it clear in his speech that he has decided not to seek a nomination.

    Audio Clip (0:49)

Related Videos (10)

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    Read My Lips

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    "Read my lips no new taxes" was the 1988 campaign promise by George Bush that helped boost his popularity with the conservative wing.

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  • There You Go Again
    There You Go Again

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    Jimmy Carter unsuccessfully attempts to play into the uncertainty that the American public had for Ronald Reagan, during a debate on October 28, 1980.

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  • The Speech
    The Speech

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    Ronald Reagan's speech in October 1964 inspired a new generation of conservative Americans.

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  • The Checkers Speech
    The Checkers Speech

    Video Clip (3:34)

    On September 23, 1952 Richard Nixon, mired in a scandal involving bribary and campaign funds, went on television and saved his political career.

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  • Campaign Spot: Best Qualified (1960)
    Campaign Spot: Best Qualified (1960)

    Video Clip (1:02)

    After some misinterpreted comments by President Eisenhower about Nixon that JFK used in a campaign ad against his opponent (Nixons Experience), Eisenhower fully endorses Nixon. But it was too little, too late. JFK won the election, by a slim margin.

    Video Clip (1:02)
  • Campaign Spot: Ice Cream (1964)
    Campaign Spot: Ice Cream (1964)

    Video Clip (1:00)

    Ice Cream first aired on Saturday, September 12, 1964, days after the broadcast of the controversial Peace Little Girl/Daisy ad. It was part of a series of LBJ's spots against Barry Goldwater.

    Video Clip (1:00)
  • Campaign Spot: Kennedy, Kennedy (1960)
    Campaign Spot: Kennedy, Kennedy (1960)

    Video Clip (1:00)

    This 1960 campaign spot makes use of JFK's relative youth and a repetitious jingle.

    Video Clip (1:00)
  • Campaign Spot: McGovern Defense (1972)
    Campaign Spot: McGovern Defense (1972)

    Video Clip (1:00)

    In this ad, McGoverns defense cuts are criticized, questioning the candidates priorities for national security.

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  • Campaign Spot: Peace Little Girl (1964)
    Campaign Spot: Peace Little Girl (1964)

    Video Clip (1:00)

    The Daisy ad, one of the most famous political ads of all time, aired only once, but was replayed on the news and elsewhere throughout LBJs campaign. The ad, which implies that a Goldwater presidency could lead to nuclear war, is believed to have played a major role in Johnsons defeat of his opponent.

    Video Clip (1:00)
  • Ask Steve: Southern Strategy
    Ask Steve: Southern Strategy

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    In this video clip from Ask Steve, the Southern Strategy is explained. It was the republican party's successful plan of getting the white southern population to shift their views from democratic to republican.

    Video Clip (1:23)

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