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What Really Happened at Custer’s Last Stand?

Custers Last Stand
Custer's Last Stand from the Battle of Little Bighorn. (Credit: GraphicaArtis/Getty Images)
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    Article Details:

    What Really Happened at Custer’s Last Stand?

    • Author

      Annette McDermott

    • Website Name

      history.com

    • Year Published

      2018

    • Title

      What Really Happened at Custer’s Last Stand?

    • URL

      https://www.history.com/news/what-really-happened-at-custers-last-stand

    • Access Date

      August 14, 2018

    • Publisher

      A+E Networks

Under skies darkened by smoke, gunfire and flying arrows, 210 men of the U.S. Army’s 7th Cavalry Unit led by Lt. Colonel George Custer confronted thousands of fierce Sioux and Cheyenne warriors on June 25, 1876, near the Little Big Horn River in present-day Montana. In less than an hour, the Indians had massacred Custer and every one of his men. The ferocious Battle of the Little Big Horn has been ennobled as “Custer’s Last Stand” – but in truth, Custer and his men never stood a fighting chance.

Custer’s early life was less than auspicious.

George Armstrong Custer, born in Ohio in 1839, earned a certificate for teaching grammar school in 1856 but had much grander goals. The following year, he entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, where he was a less-than-stellar cadet: Custer graduated dead last in his class of 1861.

When the Civil War broke out in April 1861, Custer joined the Union Army’s Cavalry and soon proved himself a competent, reliable soldier in battles such as the First Battle of Bull Run and the Battle of Gettysburg. He was promoted several times and by the time the war ended, he was a Major General in charge of a Cavalry division.

UNITED STATES - CIRCA 1900: A portrait of George Armstrong Custer, 1839-1876, the "hero" of the Indian campaigns. (Photo by Buyenlarge/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES – CIRCA 1900: A portrait of George Armstrong Custer, 1839-1876, the “hero” of the Indian campaigns. (Photo by Buyenlarge/Getty Images)

Throughout the war, Custer showed bravery and resilience time and again. He supposedly had 11 horses shot out from under him yet was only wounded once. His dogged pursuit of the Army of Northern Virginia is often partially credited for helping to end the Civil War.

Custer was never afraid of getting his hands dirty. Unlike many other generals, he led his men from the front instead of from behind and was often the first to plunge into battle.

In February 1964, Custer married Elizabeth (Libbie) Bacon. In 1866, he was promoted to Lt. Colonel in charge of the 7th U.S. Cavalry Unit and went with Libbie to Kansas to fight in the Plains Indian Wars.

Three young Native American men, probably Sioux, wearing native accessories, 1899. (Photo by Heyn/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)
Three young Native American men, probably Sioux, wearing native accessories, 1899. (Photo by Heyn/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)

The Plains Indians showed tremendous fortitude.

The Great Plains were the last Native American holdout in America. As settlers colonized the far west before the Civil War, few had put down roots in the Plains due to its dry weather and large Indian population.

But after the Civil War, far-west land became scarcer and the U.S. government granted ten percent of Plains land to settlers and railroads. A confrontation between the Plains Indians against the settlers and government forces was inevitable.

By the late 1860s, most Native Americans had been forced onto so-called Indian reservations or killed outright. Vowing to avoid the same fate, the Plains Indians settled in for a long and fierce holdout.

In the hopes of squashing the Indians’ livelihood, the government allowed the railroads to kill scores of buffalo herds to lay railroad tracks. They also urged hunters to kill as many buffalo as possible without oversight and encouraged trains to stop so passengers could massacre buffalo for sport.

The more the whites needlessly slaughtered buffalo, the angrier the Indians grew. Some staged brutal attacks on settlers and railroad workers without regard to age or gender.

To the Indians, the railroad represented an end to their livelihood, since for millennia they’d relied on free-roaming buffalo to survive. By the time Custer arrived on the scene in 1866, the war between the army and the Plains Indians was in full force.

Portrait of General Winfield Scott Hancock (1824-1886), a Federal officer during the American Civil War, with members of his staff. Left to right are Generals Francis C. Barlow, David B. Birney, Winfield S. Hancock (seated), and John Gibbon. Each of these officers was wounded during the Battle of Gettysburg. (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
Portrait of General Winfield Scott Hancock (1824-1886), a Federal officer during the American Civil War, with members of his staff. Left to right are Generals Francis C. Barlow, David B. Birney, Winfield S. Hancock (seated), and John Gibbon. Each of these officers was wounded during the Battle of Gettysburg. (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

Custer went AWOL and was court-martialed by the U.S. Army.

Custer’s first assignment was helping Major General Winfield S. Hancock carry out a shock-and-awe campaign to overwhelm the Indians. At the end of the campaign, Custer deserted and joined his wife at Fort Riley. He was court-martialed in 1867 and suspended without rank and pay for one year.

The fact that Custer – a highly-decorated and well-respected commander – deserted left many of his men and his superiors perplexed and rankled. It also demonstrated his inclination to make rash decisions, a trait that some say would have deadly consequences later.

Despite Custer’s now-tarnished reputation, the army still needed him to fight Indians. In September 1868, he returned to duty before his court-martial sentence was up and re-took command of the 7th Cavalry. On November 28, he led a campaign against a village of Cheyenne led by Chief Black Kettle, killing all Indian warriors present and earning himself a reputation as a ruthless Indian fighter.

Over the next several years, Custer discovered that fighting Indians was much different than fighting Confederate soldiers.

The Plains Indians were spread out and elusive. They rode fast ponies and knew the terrain better than Custer ever could. They were also ferocious and resolute fighters since they were not just fighting for their individual lives but their entire culture.

1887: Native American hunters pursue a herd of bison across the plains. Original Artwork: Painting by Charles Marion Russell. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)
1887: Native American hunters pursue a herd of bison across the plains. Original Artwork: Painting by Charles Marion Russell. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)

Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse were battle-hardened warriors.

In 1873, Custer faced a group of attacking Lakota Indians at the Northern Pacific Railroad Survey at Yellowstone. It was his first encounter with Lakota leaders Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse, but it wouldn’t be his last. Little did Custer know at the time the two Indians would play a role in his death a few years later.

In 1868, the U.S. government had signed a treaty recognizing South Dakota’s Black Hills as part of the Great Sioux Reservation. However, after gold was discovered in the Black Hills in 1874, the government had a change of heart and decided to break the treaty and take over the land.

Custer was tasked with relocating all Indians in the area to reservations by January 31, 1876. Any Indian who didn’t comply would be considered hostile.

The Native Americans, however, didn’t take the deception lying down. Those that could, left their reservations and traveled to Montana to join forces with Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse at their fast-growing camp. Thousands strong, the group eventually settled on banks of the Little Bighorn River.

U.S. Army plans collapsed at the last minute.

The U.S. Army dispatched three columns of soldiers, including Custer and his 7th Cavalry, to round up the Indians and return them to their reservations.

The plan was for Custer’s cavalry and Brigadier General Alfred Terry’s infantry to rendezvous with troops under the command of Colonel John Gibbon and Brigadier General George Crook. They’d then find the Indians, surround them and force their surrender.

Crook was delayed but Terry, Custer and Gibbon met-up in mid-June and after a scouting party found an Indian trail headed toward Little Big Horn Valley, they decided Custer should move in, surround the Indians and await reinforcements.

Custer forged ahead but things didn’t go as planned. Around midday on June 25, his scouts located Sitting Bull’s camp. Instead of waiting for reinforcements, however, Custer planned a surprise attack for the next day. He moved it up when he thought the Indians had discovered his position.

Custer divided his more than 600 men into four groups. He ordered one small battalion to stay with the supply train and the other two, led by Captain Frederick Benteen and Major Marcus Reno, to attack from the south and prevent the Indians from escaping. Custer would lead the final group—210 men strong—and planned to attack from the north.

Reno’s group attacked first but swiftly embarked on a disorganized retreat after realizing they were completely outnumbered. By the time they’d regrouped, at least 30 troops were dead.

Benteen’s troops came to Reno’s aid and the combined battalions joined forces on what is now known as Reno Hill. They remained there despite Custer’s order: “Benteen. Come on, Big Village, Be quick, Bring packs. P.S. Bring packs.”

At the 10-year memorial of the Battle of Little Bighorn, unidentified Lakota Sioux dance in commemoration of their victory over teh United States 7th Cavalry Regiment (under General George Custer), Montana, 1886. The photograph was taken by S.T. Fansler, at the battlefield's dedication ceremony as a national monument. (Photo by Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images)
At the 10-year memorial of the Battle of Little Bighorn, unidentified Lakota Sioux dance in commemoration of their victory over teh United States 7th Cavalry Regiment (under General George Custer), Montana, 1886. The photograph was taken by S.T. Fansler, at the battlefield’s dedication ceremony as a national monument. (Photo by Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images)

Custer’s ‘Last Stand’ became a slaughter.

The exact events of Custer’s Last Stand are unclear. What is known is that neither Benteen or Reno helped Custer despite admitting later they’d heard heavy gunfire coming from Custer’s position. Custer and his men were left to face scores of war-hungry Indians alone. Some historians believe many of Custer’s men panicked, dismounted from their horses and were shot dead as they fled.

No one knows when Custer realized he was in trouble since no eyewitness from his troops lived to tell the tale. The Sioux and Cheyenne warriors led by Crazy Horse brutally attacked with Winchester, Henry and Spencer repeating rifles as well as bows and arrows.

Most of Custer’s men were armed with Springfield single-shot carbine rifles and Colt .45 revolvers; they were easily outgunned. Custer’s line and command structure quickly collapsed, and soon it was every man for himself.

In the end, Custer found himself on the defensive with nowhere to hide and nowhere to run and was killed along with every man in his battalion. His body was found near Custer Hill, also known as Last Stand Hill, alongside the bodies of 40 of his men, including his brother and nephew, and dozens of dead horses.

Custer had suffered two bullet wounds, one near his heart and one in the head. It’s unclear which wound killed him or if the head wound happened before or after he died. In the heat of battle, it’s unlikely the Indian who shot Custer knew he’d just killed a U.S. Army icon. Even so, once word spread that Custer was dead, many Native Americans claimed to be his executioner.

After the battle, Indians stripped, scalped and dismembered their enemy’s corpses on the battlefield, possibly because they believed the souls of disfigured bodies were doomed to walk the earth forever.

Reports vary about what happened to Custer’s body. Some say it was stripped but not scalped or damaged because he wore buckskins and not a standard blue army uniform and the Indians mistook him for an innocent bystander.

Another report says his body was spared because he’d had an affair with a Cheyenne woman. Still another source claimed Custer’s corpse was mutilated and his eardrums punctured because he refused to listen to the Indians.

The aftermath of Little Big Horn spelled doom for the Plains Indians.

The Battle of the Little Big Horn didn’t end with the massacre of Custer and his men. The Indians quickly regrouped and pursued Reno’s and Benteen’s battalions. The troops fought valiantly until General Terry’s reinforcements finally arrived.

Now it was the Indians who were outnumbered so they packed up camp and fled, bringing the largest defeat of the U.S. Army during the Plains Indian Wars to an end.

The Indians reveled in their victory for a time, but their celebration was short-lived, as was their freedom. When word of Custer’s death reached Americans proudly celebrating their nation’s centennial on July 4, they demanded retribution.

The U.S. Army intensified their efforts to hunt down all Indian outlaws and either wipe them out or force them back onto reservations. Within a year, most had been rounded up or killed.

In May 1877, Crazy Horse surrendered at Fort Robinson, Nebraska, where he was later bayoneted and killed after an altercation with an army officer. After fleeing to Canada, Sitting Bull eventually surrendered in 1881 and lived on Standing Rock Reservation until he was killed by Indian agent policemen during a conflict at his house in 1890.

25th June 1876: General Custer with his men from the 7th Cavalry at the Battle of Bighorn being defeated by the combined forces of the Sioux-Cheyenne Indians. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
25th June 1876: General Custer with his men from the 7th Cavalry at the Battle of Bighorn being defeated by the combined forces of the Sioux-Cheyenne Indians. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

‘Custer’s Last Stand’ was a manufactured legacy.

Custer’s Last Stand is steeped in controversy. To this day, many people question his actions that fateful day. He’s often accused of arrogance for not following the original battle plan and leading his men to certain death. Yet it’s possible Custer believed reinforcements were on the way and wanted to strike before the Indians dispersed; it’s unlikely he expected such a well-armed attack.

It’s also argued that Reno and Benteen were simply cowards who ignored Custer’s orders when the fighting unexpectedly got tough, leaving Custer and his men to fight a losing battle. In their defense, though, they may have believed that following Custer’s orders was a suicide mission.

The dead at the Battle of the Little Big Horn were given a quick burial where they fell by the first soldiers who arrived at the scene. Custer was later disinterred and reburied at West Point. Other troops were also disinterred for private burials.

In 1881, a memorial was erected in honor of those who lost their lives. A trench was dug below the memorial to re-inter the remaining battlefield remains and a marker was erected where each soldier had fallen in battle.

While Custer never had the chance to defend his actions at the Battle of Little Big Horn, he needn’t have worried about his legacy because his widow Libbie had it safely in hand: She wanted her husband to go down in honor and boldly promoted him as a brave hero cut down in the prime of his life while defending his country.

It seems Libbie Custer’s efforts paid off. No matter how it’s interpreted over 140 years later, Custer’s Last Stand is still one of the most recognized events in U.S. history.

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