History In The Headlines

Author: Sarah Pruitt

amphibolis tomb

Amphipolis Tomb May Belong to Alexander the Great’s Mother

A pair of caryatids–or pillars made of sculpted female figures–found at the massive Greek burial complex may hint at the identity of the tomb’s occupant.

skeletons holding hands

700-Year-Old Skeletons Found Holding Hands

Archeologists excavating the Chapel of St. Morrell in England have uncovered a pair of skeletons that have been holding hands for the past 700 years.

George Clark/iStockphotos.com

The History Behind the Scottish Independence Vote

On September 18, Scottish voters will go to the polls to decide the future of their country.

stonehenge

Subterranean Mapping Reveals Secrets Underneath Stonehenge

A long-running survey of the landscape around Stonehenge has detected a subterranean network of monuments lurking beneath the prehistoric stone circle.

Gorham's Cave, Gibraltar (Credit: Stewart Finlayson)

Neanderthals May Have Been Artists, Too

A new study claims that markings found etched into the wall of a cave in Gibraltar are the work of Neanderthals, the closest extinct relatives of early modern humans.

tennis2

U.S. Open Honors Past Champ Joe Hunt, Killed During WWII

As part of the U.S. Open’s third annual Military Appreciation Day, the tennis world remembers Joe Hunt, who won a dramatic victory in the 1943 men’s championship.

Linzerino/iStockphotos.com

Ancient DNA Suggests Seals Brought Tuberculosis to New World

After analyzing DNA from 1,000-year-old Peruvian skeletons, scientists claim that seals and sea lions were likely the first to bring TB to the ancient Americas.

Reproduction of a Neanderthal woman at the National Archaeological Museum in Madrid, Spain. (Credit: Cristina Arias/Cover/Getty Images)

New Study Suggests Neanderthals and Humans Co-Existed for Millennia

In a new study, researchers claim that Neanderthals and humans may have lived alongside each other in Europe for as many as 5,000 years.

Facial reconstruction of Richard III

The Royal Diet of Richard III Revealed

A new study reveals that medieval monarch Richard III truly ate–and drank–like a king during his brief time on the English throne.

egypthierarchy

Study Explores Rise of Egyptian Pharaohs

A new study reveals how a despotic system like ancient Egypt’s could have evolved from egalitarian hunter-gatherer societies.

cavity

New Research Drills Into History of Cavities

In two new studies, scientists analyzed teeth extracted from ancient skeletons in order to learn more about one of our most enduring health problems: cavities.

Body of Huldremose Woman

Uncovering the Mysteries of the Bog Bodies

Ongoing research on two 2,000-year-old corpses preserved in the peat bogs of Denmark reveals that they both traveled from elsewhere before their deaths.

cuneiform

Prehistoric Recordkeeping System Used Long After Writing Emerged

Recent archeological finds in Turkey suggest that ancient Assyrians relied on their prehistoric bookkeeping system for some 2,000 years after the advent of writing.