Campaign Spot: Ice Cream (1964) and related media

Campaign Spot: Ice Cream (1964) (1:00)

Ice Cream first aired on Saturday, September 12, 1964, days after the broadcast of the controversial Peace Little Girl/Daisy ad. It was part of a series of LBJ's spots against Barry Goldwater.

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