November 15

This Day in History

Cold War

Nov 15, 1957:

Nikita Khrushchev challenges United States to a missile "shooting match"

In a long and rambling interview with an American reporter, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev claims that the Soviet Union has missile superiority over the United States and challenges America to a missile "shooting match" to prove his assertion. The interview further fueled fears in the United States that the nation was falling perilously behind the Soviets in the arms race.

The interview elicited the usual mixture of boastful belligerence and calls for "peaceful coexistence" with the West that was characteristic of Khrushchev's public statements during the late 1950s. He bragged about Soviet missile superiority, claiming that the United States did not have intercontinental ballistic rockets; "If she had," the Russian leader sneered, "she would have launched her own sputnik." He then issued a challenge: "Let's have a peaceful rocket contest just like a rifle-shooting match, and they'll see for themselves." Speaking about the future of East-West relations, Khrushchev stated that the American and Soviet people both wanted peace. He cautioned, however, that although the Soviet Union would never start a war, "some lunatics" might bring about a conflict. In particular, he noted that Secretary of State John Foster Dulles had created "an artificial war psychosis." In the case of war, it "would be fought on the American continent, which can be reached by our rockets." NATO forces in Europe would also be devastated, and Europe "might become a veritable cemetery." While the Soviet Union would "suffer immensely," the forces of communism would ultimately destroy capitalism.

Khrushchev's remarks came just a few days after the Gaither Report had been leaked to the press in the United States. The report supported many of the Russian leader's contentions, charging that the United States was falling far behind the Soviets in the arms race. Critics of President Dwight D. Eisenhower's foreign policy, particularly from the Democratic Party, went on the attack. The public debate concerning the alleged "missile gap" between U.S. and Soviet rocket arsenals continued through the early 1960s and was a major issue in the 1960 presidential campaign between Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy.

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