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2000

Michael Chabon’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel debuts

Chabon, who was born in Washington, D.C., in 1963, graduated from the University of Pittsburgh and earned a master’s degree in creative writing from the University of California, Irvine. His first novel, “The Mysteries of Pittsburgh,” a coming-of-age story set in the city named in the title, was written as his graduate school thesis. Published in 1988, the book became a best-seller and was later made into a movie.

Among Chabon’s other credits are “Summerland,” a 2002 fantasy novel for young adults; “The Yiddish Policemen’s Union,” a 2007 detective novel; and “Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son,” a 2009 essay collection. He has also written screenplays and several collections of short stories.

Chabon is married to novelist Ayelet Waldman, with whom he has four children. In 2005, Waldman became known for a controversial essay on marriage and motherhood in which she wrote, “I love my husband more than I love my children.”

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